shiver

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shiver

 [shiv´er]
1. a slight tremor.
2. to tremble slightly, as from cold.

shiv·er

(shiv'ĕr),
1. To shake or tremble, especially from cold.
2. A tremor; a slight chill.

shiver

(shĭv′ĕr) [ME. chiveren]
1. Involuntary increased muscle activity in response to fear, onset of fever, or exposure to cold. The activity leads to increased heat production.
2. To tremble or shake.

shiver

involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold. It is caused by contraction or twitching of the muscles, and is a physiological method of heat production in all animals.
References in classic literature ?
It had not come, but it had sent that shiver through the sea to say that it was coming.
Yet here we were; and the witch herself was actually brewing a jorum of ginger tea for Cecily, who continued to shiver long after the rest of us were roasted to the marrow.
The shivers run up and down my back at the mere thought of it.
I was trembling all over, and I could feel the shivers running up and down my spine and the sweat standing out on my forehead.
When you look at me like that, you send shivers through me
It is true that I kept down my shivers from fear of putting him out.
To say that she is flung down on her side in the waves, with her masts dipping into them, and that, springing up again, she rolls over on the other side, until a heavy sea strikes her with the noise of a hundred great guns, and hurls her back - that she stops, and staggers, and shivers, as though stunned, and then, with a violent throbbing at her heart, darts onward like a monster goaded into madness, to be beaten down, and battered, and crushed, and leaped on by the angry sea - that thunder, lightning, hail, and rain, and wind, are all in fierce contention for the mastery - that every plank has its groan, every nail its shriek, and every drop of water in the great ocean its howling voice - is nothing.
While she was looking, something came with a tremendous crash against the window, and sent the leaded panes and the old wooden framework inward in shivers, the water pouring in after it.
With a shiver of dread the boy arose and went along the road toward town.
It was a day of amber sunlight, but there was a shiver of coming winter in the air.
As he went back he did not shiver so, he had more courage for his task; the deadly brutalizing monotony of it did not afflict him so,--he had ideas while he worked, and took a more cheerful view of his circumstances.
At last, when Tom was describing one of the roughest and raggedest ones, he gave a shiver and a gasp and says: