shivering


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shivering

 [shiv´er-ing]
involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold. It is caused by contraction or twitching of the muscles, and is a physiologic method of heat production in humans and other mammals. As a form of aerobic skeletal muscle activity, vigorous shivering uses about as much energy as riding a bicycle or shoveling snow. Weak or debilitated patients tolerate this activity poorly. Patients commonly feel helpless when experiencing contractions of muscles normally under voluntary control. Increased metabolic rate and oxygen demand caused by shivering are particularly stressful for patients with heart or lung disease. Cold-induced shivering is stimulated when body temperatures drop below the thermostatic range or “set point” governed by the hypothalamus. Shivering in fever occurs not because body temperatures fall but because the set point range is driven by the pyrogen. The more vigorous the shivering, the higher the fever is driven up. Heat loss from skin is a dominant stimulus.

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing),
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

/shiv·er·ing/ (shiv´er-ing)
1. involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold.
2. a disease of horses, with trembling or quivering of various muscles.

shivering

[shiv′əring]
involuntary contractions of muscles, mainly of the skin, in response to the chilling effect of low temperatures. Shivering may also occur at the onset of a fever when the body's heat balance is disturbed.

shivering

The involuntary contraction of skeletal muscle due to exposure to cold or fright, or which is temporally related to the onset of fever

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing)
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

A rapid succession of contractions and relaxations of muscles and an important means of heat production in the body. The temperature rise in high fever is caused mainly by shivering.

shivering

References in periodicals archive ?
Lead study author, Takahiro Tadokoro, a physician anesthesiologist at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa, Japan, said, "Postoperative shivering is a frequent complication in patients recovering from general anesthesia.
In addition, shivering can also result in increased incidence of bleeding, floating clots, infection, increased carbondioxide production and even lactic acidosis.
Core temperature by tympanic thermometer and shivering were recorded before spinal puncture and 15, 30, 60 and 90 minutes after spinal puncture.
You shiver to produce heat, Shivering increases your heat output by five to six times.
One way of avoiding the shivering and related reactions has been to maintain body temperature throughout surgery.
The Elder Scrolls IV: Shivering Isles features more than 30 hours of new gameplay and allows players to explore an entirely new plane of Oblivion - the realm of Sheogorath, the Daedric Prince of Madness.
If someone is shivering uncontrollably, has suddenly stopped shivering, seems confused or is elderly, dial 999 immediately.
Meanwhile, muscles attempt to generate extra heat by shivering (tiny muscle contractions).
Shivering in snowy, freezing weather with tight security protecting him from the hatreds that still poison Bosnia, Pope John Paul II preached forgiveness Sunday to Catholics, Muslims and Orthodox alike.