shivering


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shivering

 [shiv´er-ing]
involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold. It is caused by contraction or twitching of the muscles, and is a physiologic method of heat production in humans and other mammals. As a form of aerobic skeletal muscle activity, vigorous shivering uses about as much energy as riding a bicycle or shoveling snow. Weak or debilitated patients tolerate this activity poorly. Patients commonly feel helpless when experiencing contractions of muscles normally under voluntary control. Increased metabolic rate and oxygen demand caused by shivering are particularly stressful for patients with heart or lung disease. Cold-induced shivering is stimulated when body temperatures drop below the thermostatic range or “set point” governed by the hypothalamus. Shivering in fever occurs not because body temperatures fall but because the set point range is driven by the pyrogen. The more vigorous the shivering, the higher the fever is driven up. Heat loss from skin is a dominant stimulus.

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing),
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

/shiv·er·ing/ (shiv´er-ing)
1. involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold.
2. a disease of horses, with trembling or quivering of various muscles.

shivering

[shiv′əring]
involuntary contractions of muscles, mainly of the skin, in response to the chilling effect of low temperatures. Shivering may also occur at the onset of a fever when the body's heat balance is disturbed.

shivering

The involuntary contraction of skeletal muscle due to exposure to cold or fright, or which is temporally related to the onset of fever

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing)
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

A rapid succession of contractions and relaxations of muscles and an important means of heat production in the body. The temperature rise in high fever is caused mainly by shivering.

shivering

References in periodicals archive ?
We identified two hormones that are stimulated by cold - irisin and FGF21 - released from shivering muscle and brown fat respectively," said study leader Dr Paul Lee, of Sydney University.
The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT3) plays a role in the control of perioperative shivering by its action in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamic region (4-6).
If someone is shivering uncontrollably, has suddenly stopped shivering, seems confused or is elderly, dial 999 immediately.
THE STORM PASSED IN AN HOUR AND I WAS SHIVERING UNCONTROLLABLY, STILL WET FROM THE RAIN.
Abstract: Shivering is mediated via the predominantly uncrossed reticulospinal tract.
March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Bethesda Softworks(R), a ZeniMax Media company, and 2K today announced that The Elder Scrolls(R) IV: Shivering Isles(TM), the official expansion for the award-winning The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion(R), is now shipping to retail stores throughout North America for Windows.
Bethesda Softworks(R), a ZeniMax Media company, today confirmed the upcoming release of The Elder Scrolls IV(R): Shivering Isles(TM), the official expansion for the award-winning The Elder Scrolls IV(R): Oblivion(TM).
Chong points out that while this study's results are promising, misoprostol sometimes causes troubling side effects, such as severe shivering and fever.
Engineers have told them that the central heating is too dangerous to use and turned it off a fortnight ago, leaving them shivering in the aisles.
This little dog was found shivering on a mountain in the freezing cold.
Shivering can increase your heat production by five to six times the normal amount.
Lead researcher Dr Valery Nakariakov said: 'The closest analogy is the attack of shivering we suffer having a severe cold or fever.