shift

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shift

 [shift]
a change or deviation.
antigenic shift a sudden, major change in the antigenicity of a virus, seen especially in influenza viruses, resulting from the recombination of the genomes of two different strains; it is associated with pandemics because hosts do not have immunity to the new strain. See also antigenic drift.
chloride shift the exchange of chloride and carbonate between the plasma and the erythrocytes that takes place when the blood gives up oxygen and receives carbon dioxide. It serves to maintain ionic equilibrium between the cell and surrounding fluid.
mediastinal shift a shifting to one side of the tissues and organs of the mediastinum; see also mediastinal shift.
shift to the left
1. a change in the blood picture, with a preponderance of young neutrophils.
2. an increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
shift to the right
1. a preponderance of older neutrophils in the blood picture.
2. a decreased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
weight shift
1. the frequent movement of a paralyzed or partially paralyzed patient to redistribute the patient's weight and prevent impairment of circulation, which leads to pressure sores. One variation is the wheelchair pressure release.
2. relocation of a patient's center of mass in order to allow movement; see also gait.

change

(chānj),
An alteration; in pathology, structural alteration of which the cause and significance is uncertain.
Synonym(s): shift

shift

(shift) a change or deviation.
chloride shift  the exchange of chloride (Cl−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) between plasma and the erythrocytes occurring whenever HCO3− is generated or decomposed within the erythrocytes.
Doppler shift  the magnitude of frequency change due to the Doppler effect.
shift to the left  an increase in the percentage of neutrophils having only one or a few lobes.
shift to the right  an increase in the percentage of multilobed neutrophils.

shift

Etymology: AS, sciftan, to divide
1 (in nursing) the particular hours of the day during which a nurse is scheduled to work. The day shift is usually 7:00 am to 3:00 pm or 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. The evening shift is usually 3:00 pm to 11:00 pm or 4:00 pm to 12:00 midnight, and the night shift the remaining hours. The evening shift is also called "relief," presumably because nurses originally worked 12-hour shifts and the evening and night shift was thought to be relief for the day nurse. Many innovations in staffing practice currently allow variations on the traditional 5-day, 40-hour week, such as nurses electing to work a shorter week, preferring longer hours for fewer days.
2 an abrupt change in an analytic system that continues at the new level.

shift

Vox populi
The change in a thing.

shift

(shift)
1. Synonym(s): change.
2. A period of 8-12 hours during which an employee is assigned to work on a given day. Division of each 24 hours into day, evening, and night shifts is intended to maximize efficiency.
See also: deviation

shift

a change or deviation.

antigenic shift
see antigenic shift.
chloride shift
see chloride shift.
shift to the left
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increase in the numbers of immature neutrophils, primarily band forms but metamyelocytes or more immature cells may also be present; usually in response to an infection.
Enlarge picture
Canine blood smear showing a shift to the left with a segmented neutrophil (left) with toxic vacuolation and a metamyelocyte (right) with two Döhle bodies. By permission from Willard MD, Tvedten H, Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods, Saunders, 2003
shift red cell
shift to the right
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increased number of mature neutrophils but no immature cells are present.

Patient discussion about shift

Q. I started a new job a month ago – it’s night shifts as a security guard in a large office building I don’t know why, but I started feeling very down in the last week. Can it be that the change in waking hours is effecting me?

A. there are dozens of studies about night shift workers that try to connect them to all sort of things. and there is a good reason- our hormonal balance is maintained by our Hypothalamus (an area in the brain). being awake on night time changes it's function, it changes our hormonal system balance and other things around our brain. this can easily cause things like depression amongst some people.

More discussions about shift
References in periodicals archive ?
Intriguingly, there is no agreement whatsoever among the contributors to Shifting Ground about what it all means.
Gendrauli and Diaz displayed familiarity with the shifting ground, setting up well-timed shots to score the victory before a large weekend crowd at Sands By the Bay, a makeshift court behind the SM Mall of Asia and across the famed Manila Bay.
The 10 essays in Part three, Dramaturgy in Motion: Demolitions, Definitions, and Demarcations, examine, among other things, the shifting ground for dramaturgy now that theater has taken on many different forms and its active function in theater even when there is no actual dramaturg.
The concrete walls had been pushed around by the shifting ground and were leaning away from the slope Saturday, when they were relocated to support a make-shift road being built to give heavy equipment better access to the site.
To highlight the shifting ground in world politics, Limnell talks about his own country, Finland, which is not renowned as being a major power in terms of traditional military capability.
And yet this shifting ground, and the further moves to right, left, and centre that would unfold over the course of the 1940s, actually played into the ways in which the Communist Party ended up handcuffed in its capacity to resist the tide of reaction that swept it repressively into particular corners in the 1950s.
Service-line insurance covers breaks for any reason, such as tree root invasion, shifting ground due to freezing and thawing, erosion, wear and tear and contractor accidents.
On the political-leadership level you have this kind of shifting ground, but on the street level, the polarization is still very much there," she said.
The runner-up's trainer Kevin Prendergast said: "The winner shifting ground probably cost us the race, as she [Da Re Mi] brought her across the track.
The Prime Minister was quick to make clear that he would not be shifting ground on such a crucial issue.
As the shifting ground of managed health care becomes unsteady under their feet, seniors have begun to wonder who, if anyone, is happy with this brave new world of medicine and health care.
Procurement system software, previously the province of "old school" electronic data interchange firms such as Harbinger Corp and Sterling Commerce Inc, is shifting ground under the influence of the internet, e-commerce, and the new generation of front-office customer relationship management software tools.