shift

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Related to shiftiness: reassign, reacquainted

shift

 [shift]
a change or deviation.
antigenic shift a sudden, major change in the antigenicity of a virus, seen especially in influenza viruses, resulting from the recombination of the genomes of two different strains; it is associated with pandemics because hosts do not have immunity to the new strain. See also antigenic drift.
chloride shift the exchange of chloride and carbonate between the plasma and the erythrocytes that takes place when the blood gives up oxygen and receives carbon dioxide. It serves to maintain ionic equilibrium between the cell and surrounding fluid.
mediastinal shift a shifting to one side of the tissues and organs of the mediastinum; see also mediastinal shift.
shift to the left
1. a change in the blood picture, with a preponderance of young neutrophils.
2. an increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
shift to the right
1. a preponderance of older neutrophils in the blood picture.
2. a decreased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
weight shift
1. the frequent movement of a paralyzed or partially paralyzed patient to redistribute the patient's weight and prevent impairment of circulation, which leads to pressure sores. One variation is the wheelchair pressure release.
2. relocation of a patient's center of mass in order to allow movement; see also gait.

change

(chānj),
An alteration; in pathology, structural alteration of which the cause and significance is uncertain.
Synonym(s): shift

shift

(shift) a change or deviation.
chloride shift  the exchange of chloride (Cl−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) between plasma and the erythrocytes occurring whenever HCO3− is generated or decomposed within the erythrocytes.
Doppler shift  the magnitude of frequency change due to the Doppler effect.
shift to the left  an increase in the percentage of neutrophils having only one or a few lobes.
shift to the right  an increase in the percentage of multilobed neutrophils.

shift

Etymology: AS, sciftan, to divide
1 (in nursing) the particular hours of the day during which a nurse is scheduled to work. The day shift is usually 7:00 am to 3:00 pm or 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. The evening shift is usually 3:00 pm to 11:00 pm or 4:00 pm to 12:00 midnight, and the night shift the remaining hours. The evening shift is also called "relief," presumably because nurses originally worked 12-hour shifts and the evening and night shift was thought to be relief for the day nurse. Many innovations in staffing practice currently allow variations on the traditional 5-day, 40-hour week, such as nurses electing to work a shorter week, preferring longer hours for fewer days.
2 an abrupt change in an analytic system that continues at the new level.

shift

Vox populi
The change in a thing.

shift

(shift)
1. Synonym(s): change.
2. A period of 8-12 hours during which an employee is assigned to work on a given day. Division of each 24 hours into day, evening, and night shifts is intended to maximize efficiency.
See also: deviation

shift

a change or deviation.

antigenic shift
see antigenic shift.
chloride shift
see chloride shift.
shift to the left
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increase in the numbers of immature neutrophils, primarily band forms but metamyelocytes or more immature cells may also be present; usually in response to an infection.
Enlarge picture
Canine blood smear showing a shift to the left with a segmented neutrophil (left) with toxic vacuolation and a metamyelocyte (right) with two Döhle bodies. By permission from Willard MD, Tvedten H, Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods, Saunders, 2003
shift red cell
shift to the right
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increased number of mature neutrophils but no immature cells are present.

Patient discussion about shift

Q. I started a new job a month ago – it’s night shifts as a security guard in a large office building I don’t know why, but I started feeling very down in the last week. Can it be that the change in waking hours is effecting me?

A. there are dozens of studies about night shift workers that try to connect them to all sort of things. and there is a good reason- our hormonal balance is maintained by our Hypothalamus (an area in the brain). being awake on night time changes it's function, it changes our hormonal system balance and other things around our brain. this can easily cause things like depression amongst some people.

More discussions about shift
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Ratliff, Flem is defined by both his physical and existential shiftiness, his ability to turn improvisation into something that looks like providence; but if the traveling salesman seems to represent a rather positive sort of pragmatist--a "happy-go-lucky anarchistic sort of creature" as James calls him in "Pragmatism and Humanism" (Pragmatism 124)--Flem is a rather more problematic consequence of pragmatism.
For some receivers, this shiftiness at the LOS comes naturally.
In the latest example of this neural shiftiness, kittens born deaf due to an ear abnormality were then exposed to sounds through an ear implant.
knowledge, shiftiness of truth, and undecidability of value.
In a time when we are especially alert to the salience and shiftiness of signifiers, Mandel's efforts to establish and document the provenance of Hemingway's references - even the most casual - are of obvious value.
Over and again, we encounter a vocabulary that makes the quaking world of Montaigne's "branloire perenne" seem gentlemanly and tranquil by comparison: meretricious, complicity, illusory, transgression, mask, treachery, dissimulation, madness, subversion, unstable, precarious, unreliable, shiftiness, mirage, simulation, deceptions, sinister, violence, radical ambiguity, radical instability, radical contingency, radical crisis.
The 5-foot-4 Baldino used his speed and shiftiness to create opportunities all night, beginning just 44 seconds in when he beat Wildcats goalie Tyler Spaulding to make it 1-0.
But his Little Englander outburst on education - coinciding with his shiftiness on Europe - came just weeks after David Cameron told Kim Jong-Robbo and Kim Jong-Marty where to go on corporation tax.
It finally clicked for Boseko in the fourth game, on the road against Churchill, when he rushed for 210 yards and two touchdowns while showing off a shiftiness that belied his 6-foot-3, 215-pound frame.
75) There are several reasons for this: both manual labor and the ascetic life involve great effort and toil; both mandate constancy and dedication rather than shiftiness or instability; both necessitate that one be focused on a goal toward which one's daily activities are directed; both entail working under supervision and are therefore conducive to humility; both offer grounds for the authentic community that results from individuals respecting the supervisor's role; finally, both entail a preference for practice over theory, for deeds over words.
The final piece, Kathleen Stewart's "Trauma Time: A Still Life," yokes the broad scope under the notion of "trauma time"--the time "when things in themselves act as conduits channeling the literal into the figural and back, 'meaning' is no longer something simply and surely located in a symbolic system or in the eyes of the viewer but in a spark generated out of the very shiftiness of subjects and objects" (331).
The atmosphere of furtive shiftiness and moronic bigotry got right up the nose of Margaret McCarthy who was appalled by the "show trials" she witnessed in a Glasgow party chapter-meeting in 1934.