shelter-in-place

shelter-in-place

, sheltering-in-place (shel′tĕr)
To seek protection from an environmental hazard by sealing oneself in a safe and secure location instead of fleeing or evacuating. One must stay indoors and rely on stored supplies or, if materials must be imported from a contaminated environment, rely on filtration systems that remove toxins, viruses, bacteria, and other potentially dangerous materials until the hazard passes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The core of ICE PACK's Shelter-In-Place emergency sustainment system includes the necessary emergency sustainment supplies needed to keep critical infrastructures operational, organizations functioning and people thriving for several days to two weeks, until public utilities, civil and social services are restored or rescue occurs," says Morris Peterson, President and CEO of Ashbury.
When a chemical tanker overturns releasing toxic vapors into the atmosphere, windows are blown out due to violent storms, walls smashed, roofs torn off or floodwaters rise, ICE PACK's Shelter-In-Place system can provide you with life-critical shelter improvement and repair materials which allow you to temporarily secure your shelter location or make critical repairs that saves valuable property," says Peterson.
ICE PACK's Shelter-In-Place systems provide users with three days of hot meals, safe drinking water, medical supplies, all hazard NOAA weather radio crisis communications, personal hygiene and sanitation, shelter repair supplies, life safety smoke/carbon monoxide detection and emergency tools.
Each Shelter-In-Place system is sized for individuals, families or groups and can be customized for large organizational use.
The recent "Shelter-In-Place Fundamentals for Public and Private Sector Organizations" professional workshop held in August is the core foundation of ICE PACK's Shelter-In-Place training program scheduled for the Spring of 2012.