shellfish

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shellfish

(shĕl′fĭsh′)
n. pl. shellfish or shell·fishes
1. Any of various edible aquatic invertebrate animals having a shell, especially mollusks such as clams and oysters, and crustaceans such as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp.
2. An edible mollusk, in contrast to a crustacean: regulations concerning fish, crustaceans, and shellfish.
3. The edible flesh of such animals.

shell′fish′ing n.

shellfish

(shel′fish″)
Any of a group of marine animals that include mollusks and crustaceans. Allergic reactions (urticaria, asthma, angioedema, anaphylaxis) to a wide variety of shellfish are among the most common causes of food allergy in humans.

shellfish

an aquatic animal having a shell; includes molluscs, e.g. oyster, and crustaceans, e.g. shrimp, lobster.

paralytic shellfish poisoning
see paralytic shellfish poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some men started in shellfishing because it was the highest paying job available; others were attracted by the independence associated with it.
The fishermen remain on the beds because: 1) They are physically and mentally adjusted to fishing (they are used to irregular hours); 2) if they had been brought into shellfishing by a favorite relative, such as their father, they feel bound to do the, things he had taught them; 3) they do not want to sell the boat they may have worked to obtain or acquired from a relative; 4) if they took a job ashore, they would lose their autonomy and independence (a psychologically stressful solution); 5) they know the shellfishing business, but they do not know other jobs well and therefore feel uneasy in them; 6) shellfishing has little or no paperwork, and most fishermen resent paperwork in another job; and 7) fishermen simply enjoy the solitude on the water.
Such events are common among shellfishing families during periods of shellfish scarcity.
Fishermen have much more knowledge about factors relating to shellfishing than most people suspect.
The economics of shellfishing allows little margin for risk and thus fishermen are extremely hesitant to assume the risk of innovations, especially if their advantages over traditional methods are uncertain.
In shellfishing communities, a common complaint about research is that irrelevance, i.