shellfish

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shellfish

(shĕl′fĭsh′)
n. pl. shellfish or shell·fishes
1. Any of various edible aquatic invertebrate animals having a shell, especially mollusks such as clams and oysters, and crustaceans such as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp.
2. An edible mollusk, in contrast to a crustacean: regulations concerning fish, crustaceans, and shellfish.
3. The edible flesh of such animals.

shell′fish′ing n.

shellfish

(shel′fish″)
Any of a group of marine animals that include mollusks and crustaceans. Allergic reactions (urticaria, asthma, angioedema, anaphylaxis) to a wide variety of shellfish are among the most common causes of food allergy in humans.

shellfish

an aquatic animal having a shell; includes molluscs, e.g. oyster, and crustaceans, e.g. shrimp, lobster.

paralytic shellfish poisoning
see paralytic shellfish poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
To reach that conclusion, the court first categorized the tribes' shellfishing right as a property interest which is less than a fee simple interest in the land and therefore entitled to less protection than land ownership.
The court relied on the canons of treaty construction to determine the extent of tribal shellfishing rights.
346) In Shellfish II the district court included the state in its definition of citizen because "when the State creates artificial beds, it does so for the benefit of all its citizens, many of whom visit state parks to participate in recreational shellfishing.
389) Because growers have an economic interest in underestimating the prevalence of these beds, the court's placement of the "burden" runs the risk of depriving the tribes of their shellfishing right.
Personal visits afford opportunities for: 1) Gaining insight into the lives, outlook, and culture of the fishing community, and 2) discovering the local leaders of public opinion and the fishermen who are progressive in outlook, besides learning a considerable amount about shellfishing.
Long-time residents can supply information about shellfishing history and changes that have taken place.
Most shellfishing communities have a few unofficial leaders of points-of-view who may wish to remain as such.
It is more efficient to make improvements on beds that already support commercial shellfishing, because: 1) They receive substantial shellfish sets almost annually, 2) most environmental factors for shellfish are nearly optimum, and 3) they usually have only one or two major limiting factors for shellfish.