shell


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Related to shell: shell shock, Shell scripting

shell

(shel),
An outer covering.

shell

Etymology: AS, scell
1 a hard outer protective covering that encloses material.
2 a principal energy level occupied by an electron in an atom.

shell

(shel)
An outer covering.

shell

any hard outer covering, such as the carapace of turtles and tortoises, the exoskeleton of crustaceans, the calcareous plates of echinoderms, the outermost membranes of an egg, the skeleton of Foraminifera or the mantle secretions of molluscs.

impression, eye

A negative form or replica of the anterior part of the eye. A substance with rapid gelling properties is held in contact with the eye until gelled. This impression (or mould) is then used in the preparation of a positive model called a cast (or casting) of the anterior part of the eye: it is made by filling the impression with a material containing a plaster of Paris base which hardens to artificial stone. Using this cast a shell of a scleral contact lens is produced with optimum shape of the back surface. Syn. impression; impression moulding; mould; ocular impression.
References in classic literature ?
While the shells continued to shriek and explode, now near, now far, Jerry investigated the happening.
Nor has Patagonia been affected only by upward movements: the extinct tertiary shells from Port St.
From recent sea-shells being found on two of the higher step-formed plains, which must have been modelled and upraised before the mud was deposited in which the Macrauchenia was entombed, it is certain that this curious quadruped lived long after the sea was inhabited by its present shells.
The light disclosed the frightful injury which a fragment of the shell had inflicted on the Englishwoman's head.
He turned from the bed, and illustrated his disgust by spitting on the fragments of the exploded shell.
We have evidence in the loess of the Rhine of considerable changes of level in the land within a very recent geological period, and when the surface was peopled by existing land and fresh-water shells.
Without a moment's loss of time a small boat put off in the direction of its fall; some divers plunged into the water and attached ropes to the handles of the shell, which was quickly dragged on board.
Hardly had the shell been opened when the cat leaped out, slightly bruised, but full of life, and exhibiting no signs whatever of having made an aerial expedition.
Soon the nature of the soil changed; to the sandy plain succeeded an extent of slimy mud which the Americans call "ooze," composed of equal parts of silicious and calcareous shells.
It comes o' sittin' on th' grass under a tree wi' Dickon an' wi' Captain an' Soot an' Nut an' Shell.
The smoking shell spun like a top between him and the prostrate adjutant, near a wormwood plant between the field and the meadow.
Now how did those masses of oyster- shells get there?