shear

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shear

 [shēr]
an applied force that tends to cause an opposite but parallel sliding motion of the planes of an object. Such motions cause tissues and blood vessels to move in such a way that blood flow may be interrupted, placing the patient at risk for pressure ulcers. An example of a shearing force is seen when a patient slumps in a chair; the skin around the buttocks is stretched by the movement and interferes with circulation.

shear

(shēr),
The distortion of a body by two oppositely directed parallel forces. The distortion consists of a sliding over one another of imaginary planes (within the body) parallel to the planes of the forces.
[A.S.]

shear

(shîr)
v. sheared, sheared or shorn (shôrn), shearing, shears
v.tr.
1. To remove (fleece or hair) by cutting or clipping.
2. To remove the hair or fleece from.
v.intr.
To use a cutting tool such as shears.
n.
1. often shears
a. A pair of scissors.
b. Any of various implements or machines that cut with a scissorlike action.
2. The act, process, or result of shearing, especially when used to indicate a sheep's age: a two-shear ram.
3. Something cut off by shearing.

shear′er n.

shear

[shir]
Etymology: AS, scearan, to cut
an applied force or pressure exerted against the surface and layers of the skin as tissues slide in opposite but parallel planes.
enlarge picture
Torn aorta caused by shearing force

shear

imposed load, delivering equal (in magnitude) and opposite (in direction) parallel forces, that tends to displace the object along a plane parallel to and between lines of force, causing adjacent structures to slide past one another; tissues are subjected to shear load during movement

shear,

n any force that causes slippage between a pair of contiguous articulated parts in a direction that parallels the plane in which they contact.
shear, inferior innominate,
n a condition in which the movement of the hipbone is restricted in upward and unrestricted in downward directions because the posterior and anterior superior iliac spines (PSIS and ASIS, respectively) are positioned below the contralateral points.
shear, inferior pubic,
n a condition in which one pubic bone is displaced below its normal mate.
shear, posterior pubic,
n a condition in which one pubic bone is displaced rearward of its normal mate.
shear, sacral,
n complex nonphysiologic translational sacral motion relative to the hipbones.
shear, superior innominate,
n a condition in which the movement of the hipbone is unrestricted in upward and restricted in downward directions because the posterior and anterior superior iliac spines (PSIS and ASIS, respectively) are positioned above the contralateral points.
shear, superior pubic,
n a condition in which one pubic bone is displaced above its normal mate.
shear, symphyseal (sim·f·sēlˑ shērˑ),
n condition in which the two halves of the symphysis slide over one other in a direction parallel to the plane in which they contact.

shear

(shēr)
Distortion of a body by two oppositely directed parallel forces; consists of a sliding over one another of imaginary planes (within body) parallel to planes of forces.
[A.S.]

shear,

shear

1. to remove the fleece of a sheep.
2. pressure on a mass in such a way that planes within it are pressured to move in a direction parallel to the pressure. Any movement is proportional to the distance from the plane at which movement occurs.

shear injury
injury to tissues caused by shear pressure. See shearing injuries (2).
shear stress
the stress to which a tissue is subjected by a shear force without injury actually occurring.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ASTM D-143 standard [1] specifies shear block specimens with a sheared surface of approximately 2500 [mm.
The earlier study [8] revealed significant correlation between the two strength values obtained by standard ASTM procedure and with an alternative jig that produces a sheared area of only 625 [mm.
Objectives included studying the consequences of gradually decreased width, length, and area of the sheared plane in terms of measured strength.
There were 10 replications for constant width and length having one-directional changes of sheared surfaces and 4 replications for any other dimensional co mbinations.
Thus, shear strengths were expected to be better correlated to the area of sheared surfaces.
Alderman and Mackley (12) studied morphological changes in oscillatory sheared nematic liquid crystalline copolyesters.
Figure 1 shows the observed changes in transmitted light intensity (steady-state values) for samples sheared at different shear rates and at different temperatures.
It should be emphasized that samples quenched after they had been sheared and when the light intensity had returned to the initial base line level (100% relaxation) still exhibited significant chain orientation (f [approximately equal to] 0.
The degree of chain orientation increased with increasing shear rate and was the same for samples that were preheated to 320 [degrees] C and then sheared at 290 [degrees] C as for those that were not preheated [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 5 OMITTED].
The sample was heated to 290 [degrees] C and directly sheared, The relaxation of orientation after cessation of shear was not complete, as judged by the high level of the transmitted light intensity at rest [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 6 OMITTED].
Results from the drilling program indicate that gold mineralization is widespread and associated with sulphide mineralization (pyrite) in sheared diorites and altered intermediate metavolcanics.
Recalculation of reserves across the full width of the sheared and altered zone of gold mineralization indicates a global resource of between 425,000 and 525,000 ounces of contained gold at grades between 0.