shape

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shape

(shāp) [AS. sceapan]
1. To mold to a particular form.
2. Outward form; contour.
References in classic literature ?
Darkness full of thunder followed, and after the thunder Father Brown's voice said out of the dark: "Doctor, this paper is the wrong shape.
Of all these crooked things, the crookedest was the shape of that piece of paper.
457 inches further from them than the other, and accordingly know my shape to be 6.
When he found her listening attentively to him, he implored the Princess to allow him to resume his natural shape.
Immediately he took the shape of a harpy, and, filled with rage, was determined to devour his son, and even the Princess too, if only he could overtake them.
Assume your proper shapes, gormandizers, and begone to the sty
So you will not be surprised to hear that they have all taken the shapes of swine
Would it not be well, sir, if one of us could see this monster in her real shape at close quarters?
He said, "I differed indeed from other YAHOOS, being much more cleanly, and not altogether so deformed; but, in point of real advantage, he thought I differed for the worse: that my nails were of no use either to my fore or hinder feet; as to my fore feet, he could not properly call them by that name, for he never observed me to walk upon them; that they were too soft to bear the ground; that I generally went with them uncovered; neither was the covering I sometimes wore on them of the same shape, or so strong as that on my feet behind: that I could not walk with any security, for if either of my hinder feet slipped, I must inevitably fail.
The facts relating to this apparition (entered in various log-books) agreed in most respects as to the shape of the object or creature in question, the untiring rapidity of its movements, its surprising power of locomotion, and the peculiar life with which it seemed endowed.
Some of the chairs were made in the shape of big crows and upholstered with cushions of corn-colored silk.
But I should ill become this Throne, O Peers, And this Imperial Sov'ranty, adorn'd With splendor, arm'd with power, if aught propos'd And judg'd of public moment, in the shape Of difficulty or danger could deterre Me from attempting.