shamanistic


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shamanistic

Ethnomedicine
adjective Referring to a shaman or an ethnomedical ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even Lewis-Williams, however, for all his sympathetic understanding of shamanism, ultimately considers the shamanistic belief in a supernatural order to be unfounded (2002: 205), no doubt, from his modem scientific materialist perspective.
construed after the fact as shamanistic, which represented a summons by
In Paridegi, the author Hwang Sok-yong presents his own version of postcolonial odyssey--the voyages of colonial or postcolonial subjects to the center of empire--by rewriting the shamanistic oral narrative of Paridegi.
What makes this jar such a rarity is the inclusion of a human figure, believed to be San Shin, the most popular of the Korean shamanistic spirits, seen sitting under a pine tree pulling the tail of his messenger, the tiger.
With their Bacchanal beats, shamanistic live performances and philosophy of recreational hedonism The White Negroes are one of the great live acts.
He received the Order of Canada in 1978, established the Thunderbird School of Shamanistic Arts and founded the Woodland style of painting in 1979, and was honored as the only Canadian painter exhibited at the Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris for the celebration of the French Bicentennial in 1989.
It belongs primarily to the area of shamanistic experience.
In it, a grief-stricken mother leams that her sick son is under a spell of a shamanistic family friend, who holds the keys to his life in the form of a magic button.
The awkward blend of classic-rock influences and experimentation that tripped up "Lions," the last record before the band's break, is a distant memory as "Warpaint" unabashedly plays to the band's strengths, namely the stately guitar playing of Rich Robinson and shamanistic presence of singer and lyricist Chris Robinson.
The combination of her capacity to enter trance states, her at times profound healing connection with her audience, might lead one to consider that Gillis, particularly in performance, possesses certain shamanistic qualities.
It covers subjects that range from the classification of Turkic languages to religion, literature, the arts, and general lifestyle; from the inception of Turkic history documented by Runic inscriptions on the Orkhon River in Mongolia, to the rise and decline of the Ottoman Empire and the birth of the Republic of Turkey; from the shamanistic cults of Turks in Siberia to Islam, whose standard-bearers were the Ottoman Turks confronting Europe in the Balkans and the Mediterranean.
She specifies a preference for "an interdisciplinary interpretation of journey that takes inspiration from anthropological, psychological, shamanistic and mystical sources.