shamanism

(redirected from shamanist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

shamanism

/sha·man·ism/ (shah´-) (sha´mah-nizm″) a traditional system, occurring in tribal societies, in which certain individuals (shamans) are believed to be gifted with access to an invisible spiritual world and are able to mediate between it and the physical world to heal, divine, and affect events in the latter.

shamanism

a form of healing that incorporates personal healing, transformation, and regeneration through access to a "higher power." Sickness, disease, and illness are indicators that the individual is out of balance and in disharmony within the essential nature. Success can be achieved if people are, first, willing to take responsibility for the creation of the disease and, second, open to nonphysical realities of life and willing to engage with their inner spirit and their higher selves. This type of healing has been effective for sexual dysfunction, chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health concerns, and obesity and other eating disorders.

shamanism

Ethnomedicine/Paranormal
An ancient spiritual and medical tradition still practised in many tribal cultures, which is based on the belief that healing has a spiritual (i.e., “other world”) dimension. To effect healing, shamans enter altered states of consciousness in order to communicate with other planes of existence, taking a journey to help the patient rediscover his or her connection to nature and the other plane. Shamanism is steeped in ritual (such as divination, dream interpretation and prophecy) and tribal psychology (through drumming, story-telling and chanting).

shamanism (shôˑ·mn·izm),

n a diverse set of ritual healing practices that use trance and spiritual practices for therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Which are the Zalmoxian and Shamanist groups' links to political and social movements and organizations?
Within the shamanist tradition, for example, it is possible to "mind-call" the animal (as Mutwa puts it (58)), who is also telepathic and capable of a response.
90) William of Rubruck and Marco Polo both have left descriptions of the religious diversity to be found at the court of the khans, and how shamanist, Buddhist, Muslim, Jewish, and Christian ceremonies were performed openly and without interference or disruption.
When dogs first arrived in the Americas, as companions to humans crossing the Bering land bridge, they carried with them the cultural baggage of their shamanist handlers.
Excellent ethnographies of contemporary ritual practice in Siberia among Sakhas (Yamada) and Khanti (Pentikainen) go far in substantiating this "feel of oneness" in both classic shamanist and non-Ainu contexts.
He puts a spin on Emerson's own premise when he writes that a man seems to repossess something of the female's procreative powers of the womb in his embrace of the organic world: a man's nurture and fathering powers are aroused by the language of natural forms, and he feels a return of magic and shamanist rapport with the gods of earth.
Korea's shamanist heritage promotes a non-rational and emotional view of the world.
James clearly was the powerhouse of the pair, and is a shamanist poet as the other Dickey is not.
As a Korean woman, I was raised in the 5,000-year-old Shamanist tradition and the 2,000-year-old Taoist-Confucian tradition, with 2,000 years of Buddhist tradition, 100 years of Protestant tradition, and twenty years of eco-feminist tradition.
There are discussions of its commercial importance, especially in the town of Molln, Austria; its religious aspect as a shamanist instrument, particularly in Siberia, and its use in courtship rituals in various cultures of both East and West.
For centuries they have been Lamaist Buddhists, but their cultural memory reaches back to a more distant shamanist period.
Religions (2004): Buddhist Lamaism 50%, Muslim 4% (primarily in the southwest), shamanist and Christian 6%, and none 40%.