shamanism

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shamanism

/sha·man·ism/ (shah´-) (sha´mah-nizm″) a traditional system, occurring in tribal societies, in which certain individuals (shamans) are believed to be gifted with access to an invisible spiritual world and are able to mediate between it and the physical world to heal, divine, and affect events in the latter.

shamanism

a form of healing that incorporates personal healing, transformation, and regeneration through access to a "higher power." Sickness, disease, and illness are indicators that the individual is out of balance and in disharmony within the essential nature. Success can be achieved if people are, first, willing to take responsibility for the creation of the disease and, second, open to nonphysical realities of life and willing to engage with their inner spirit and their higher selves. This type of healing has been effective for sexual dysfunction, chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health concerns, and obesity and other eating disorders.

shamanism

Ethnomedicine/Paranormal
An ancient spiritual and medical tradition still practised in many tribal cultures, which is based on the belief that healing has a spiritual (i.e., “other world”) dimension. To effect healing, shamans enter altered states of consciousness in order to communicate with other planes of existence, taking a journey to help the patient rediscover his or her connection to nature and the other plane. Shamanism is steeped in ritual (such as divination, dream interpretation and prophecy) and tribal psychology (through drumming, story-telling and chanting).

shamanism (shôˑ·mn·izm),

n a diverse set of ritual healing practices that use trance and spiritual practices for therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the shamanist tradition, for example, it is possible to "mind-call" the animal (as Mutwa puts it (58)), who is also telepathic and capable of a response.
Lam's ebony raid on Desmoiselles in his 1942 painting The Jungle offers piquant colonized commentary on the Picasso bordello--now set in a sugar-cane-surround, rounding out cubist flatness in Africanesque volume, hybridizing plants, animals, and people in a telling Surrealist gesture that also opens toward traditional shamanist shape-shifting (Linsley, 294).
The historical figure who may have been an inspiration for the delineation of that literary character was probably Ghazzan, a Buddhist or Shamanist convert to Islam demonstrating tolerance for Christianity and fighting alongside his Christian father-in-law (Hornstein 1941: 82-87).
After Korea's liberation in 1945, So's poetry showed a more "native" voice, a Korean sentiment colored with shamanist tradition and Buddhism.
Shamanist cultures do not provide deep information even to their own members until certain cognitive thresholds are met by initiatory experiences.
Nasal bleeding is not the metaphor for, nor index of, trance that shamanists maintain; more plausibly, in both ethnographies and paintings, it signifies the imminence of actual 'death' (by lethal possession).
Ethnographies show that healing, dancing, trance and nasal bleeding are not a package, as shamanists assume.
There are scores of ex-Mormons, shamanists, pagans, and atheists meeting up, hoping to find comradery.
Like Confucianism, it taught righteousness and revered learning; like Buddhism, it sought purity and promised a future life; like shamanists, Christians believed in answered prayer and miracles.
30) Gradually, however, the authority of the Christian saint rose, and in 1916 the missionary Tutomlin pointed out that "among the native shamanists St.