shackling


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shackling

see shackle.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Israeli Prison Service is responsible for shackling prisoners to their
Eighteen states already ban the shackling of pregnant, incarcerated women.
Part V of this Article surveys each States' current juvenile courtroom shackling practices and classifies those practices into four categories: (1) States that permit blanket shackling of juveniles; (2) States that do not permit blanket shackling via state legislation or regulation; (3) States that do not permit blanket shackling via written court policy; (4) States where appellate case law has prohibited indiscriminate shackling of juveniles; and (5) States that have pending legislation which will prohibit indiscriminate shackling.
Furthermore), the shackling of detainees outside the detention center shall be effected solely by the use of handcuffs, in such manner that the accompanying MP is shackled by the hand to the detainee, or when two detainees are shackled together and the MP accompanies them.
In its opinion, the court said those shackling practices were also contrary to the "principles of therapeutic justice, a concept which this court has previously acknowledged.
10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) has released its resolution on shackling of children in juvenile court.
But why would a newspaper capable of taking this sensible stand also countenance the inane front-page reader poll which only a few days earlier reported that 51 percent of respondents favored the shackling of these prisoners during labor and childbirth?
said he will ask the state Department of Corrections for an official report on the practice of shackling women prisoners during labor and childbirth.
The Bar Board of Governors have endorced a procedural rule prohibiting the presumptive shackling of children in delinquency appearances.
The appeals court affirmed, finding that the detainee stated an equal protection claim by alleging that the sheriff for no legitimate reason, treated hospitalized detainees differently from jail detainees by shackling them to their beds and not taking them to court on their assigned court dates.
Shackling would be allowed only if the judge finds it is necessary to prevent physical harm to the child or others; the child has a history of disruptive courtroom behavior; there is "founded belief" the child is a flight risk; and there are no less restrictive alternatives, such as the presence of law enforcement officers.
The court found that deliberate indifference claims were stated by the prisoner against the guard lieutenant who ordered the shackling and the sergeant who heard the prisoner's complaints and took no action.