sexual response cycle


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sexual response cycle

the four phases of biological sexual response: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.
A term that encompasses the phases of a sexual act from prearousal to denouement. The sexual response cycle is divided into 4 phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, resolution

sexual response cycle

Physiology A term that encompasses the phases of a sexual act from prearousal to denouement; the SRC is divided into 4 phases. Cf Sexual dysfunction.
Sexual Response Cycle
Desire Consists of fantasies about sexual activity, desire to engage therein
Excitement Subjective component of sexual excitement is accompanied by physiologic changes, in ♂, penile tumescence and erection, in ♀ pelvic vasocongestion, vaginal lubrication, and swelling of external genitalia
Orgasm Peaking of sexual pleasure with release of sexual tension, rhythmic contraction of perineal muscles in ♂, ejaculation, in ♀, contractions of outer13 of vagina; in both, anal sphincter contracts rhythmically
Resolution Denouement Muscle relaxation, and a sense of well-being; during resolution, ♂ are unerectable for a variable period of time; ♀ remain on 'red alert'
References in periodicals archive ?
Postmenopausal women often find the arousal phase of the sexual response cycle takes longer or is less intense.
With respect to its impact on the sexual response cycle, it is important to understand that alcohol is a central nervous system depressant that slows down brain functioning, respiration, and circulation (Peugh & Belenko, 2001).
More recently, Basson (1999) developed a female sexual response cycle based on the experiences of women.
I have written an extensive critique of the scientific basis of this "human sexual response cycle model" in the references already cited, but suffice it to say here that Masters and Johnson chose research subjects whose orgasmocentric sexual script produced the type of physical cycle they were looking for.
Psychosexual dysfunctions, characterized by inhibitions in sexual desire or the physiological changes that characterize the sexual response cycle, are undiagnosable in children, although there is reason to assume that they may be manifest.
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) conceptualizes sexual disorders as "disturbances in the processes that characterize the sexual response cycle or by pain associated with sexual intercourse" and includes: (1) sexual desire disorders, (2) sexual arousal disorders, (3) orgasmic disorders, and (4) sexual pain disorders, which include dyspareunia, vaginismus, and noncoital sexual pain.
In October 1998, AFUD again revised the female sexual response cycle by introducing the concept of sexual satisfaction.
Sexual dysfunction is defined as distress and impairment resulting from a disturbance in sexual desire and the emotional and physiological changes of the sexual response cycle.
Sipski, Alexander and Rosen (2001) have investigated the effects that psychogenic factors can have on the traditional sexual response cycle in women.