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right

 [rīt]
something that is due to someone by law or by tradition.
right to fair treatment the fair selection and treatment of subjects during the course of a research study. Principles governing fairness include informed voluntary decision by the subjects to participate and selection according to criteria directly related to the study rather than according to artificial social or cultural biases.
negative right a right to refuse care or not to be interfered with; it obligates another to refrain from doing something. One example is the right to refuse treatment, which is grounded in the principle of respect for autonomy. This is mentioned in the “Patient's Bill of Rights;” see patient's rights.
patient's r's see patient's rights.
positive right a right to be provided with a good or service such as health care, usually grounded in the principle of justice. It is philosophically more difficult to justify than a negative right because it obligates another to do something.

congenital heart disease

A congenital malformation–eg, coarctation of aorta, VSD, ASD, tetraology of Fallot–of the heart or great blood vessels, which may or may not have clinical consequences. See Baby Faye heart, Shunt.
Congenital heart disease
Rightleft shunt Cyanotic shunt Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great vessels, trucus arteriosus, tricuspid valve atresia
Leftright shunt Acyanotic shunt Patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, aortic coarctation (NEJM 2000; 342:256rv)

right

(rit) [AS. riht],

R; rt

1. Pert. to the dextral side of the body (the side away from the heart), which in most persons is the stronger or preferred. Synonym: dexter
2. Legal authority to supervise and control one's own actions or the actions of others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Achievement of these objectives is not possible without setting right our system of education.
If you don't get your passing right, you can't get the setting right and then you can't win the points.
If Attorney General Bill Lockyer wants to get some good press in his run for state treasurer in 2006, he should consider setting right this case - and reforming the process to protect patients from possibly dangerous docs.