seton

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se·ton

(sē'tŏn),
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]

seton

[sē′ton]
thread, gauze, or other material passed through subcutaneous tissue or a cyst to create a sinus or fistula.

se·ton

(sē'tŏn)
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]

seton

1. a thin woven fabric wick, 6 in × 0.25 in, used as a primitive vaccination technique by dipping the seton in a bowl of 'vaccine', e.g. pleural exudate from a case of contagious bovine pneumonia.
2. a thread of gauze or other suture material threaded through tissue and used to keep a wound open.
References in periodicals archive ?
Born an Episcopalian in New York, Elizabeth Ann Bayley (1774-1821), married (1794) William Magee Seton (1768-1803).
Although a pioneer Catholic educator of the early 19th century, Elizabeth Seton was neither the first to establish a Catholic school nor the founder of the parochial school system in the United States (Maynard, 1941).
Elizabeth Seton and her Sisters of Charity began Saint Joseph's Academy and Free School at Emmitsburg, Maryland, in 1810.
At a meeting of the hierarchy of the United States in 1852, Robert Seton (1839-1927) recalled the reputation of his grandmother.
While Elizabeth adeptly managed her expanded household in Manhattan, she also found great enjoyment in instructing her daughter and the youngest Seton girls at home.