serotonin


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Related to serotonin: dopamine, melatonin

serotonin

 [ser″o-to´nin]
a hormone and neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), found in many tissues, including blood platelets, intestinal mucosa, pineal body, and central nervous system; it has many physiologic properties, including inhibition of gastric secretion, stimulation of smooth muscles, and production of vasoconstriction.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ō-tō'nin),
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by blood platelets, that inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; present in relatively high concentrations in some areas of the central nervous system (hypothalamus, basal ganglia), and occurring in many peripheral tissues and cells and in carcinoid tumors.
[sero- + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]

serotonin

/sero·to·nin/ (ser″o-to´nin) a hormone and neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), found in many tissues, including blood platelets, intestinal mucosa, the pineal body, and the central nervous system; it has many physiologic properties including inhibition of gastric secretion, stimulation of smooth muscles, and production of vasoconstriction.

serotonin

(sĕr′ə-tō′nĭn, sîr′-)
n.
An organic compound, C10H12N2O, that is formed from tryptophan and is found especially in the gastrointestinal tract, the platelets, and the nervous system of humans and other animals, and functions as a neurotransmitter and in vasoconstriction, stimulation of the smooth muscles, and regulation of cyclic body processes.

serotonin

[ser′ətō′nin, sir′-]
Etymology: L, serum + Gk, tonos, tone
a naturally occurring derivative of tryptophan found in platelets and in cells of the brain and the intestine. Serotonin is released from platelets on damage to the blood vessel walls. It acts as a potent vasoconstrictor. Serotonin in intestinal tissue stimulates the smooth muscle to contract. In the central nervous system, it acts as a neurotransmitter. Lysergic acid diethylamide interferes with the action of serotonin in the brain. The normal concentration of serotonin in the urine is 0.05 to 0.2 μg/mL. Also called 5-hydroxytryptamine.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]

serotonin

5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). A NEUROTRANSMITTER and HORMONE found in many tissues, especially the brain, the intestinal lining and the blood platelets. Serotonin is concerned in controlling mood and levels of consciousness. Its action is disturbed by some hallucinogenic drugs and imitated by others. It constricts small blood vessels, cuts down acid secretion by the stomach and contracts the muscles in the wall of the intestine.

serotonin

a pharmacologically active compound, derived from tryptophan, which acts as a vasodilator, increases capillary permeability, and causes contraction of smooth muscle.

Serotonin

A chemical produced by the brain that functions as a neurotransmitter. Low serotonin levels are associated with mood disorders, particularly depression. Medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used to treat BDD and other disorders characterized by depressed mood.

serotonin

a monoamine (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) formed from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Its widespread actions include vasoconstriction, inhibition of gastric secretion and stimulation of smooth muscle. It is also an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system; as such it is involved in pain transmission and perception, and can influence a variety of behaviours, including tiredness, sleep, mood and mental fatigue. It is suggested that an increased level of serotonin makes it mentally harder to maintain a steady pace of exercise, as in running or cycling ('central fatigue'). Administration of branched-chain amino acids has been claimed to reduce uptake of tryptophan by the brain and therefore to diminish serotonin production. See also ergogenic aids; appendix 4.4 .

serotonin

; 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT vasoconstrictor phospholipid; liberated by platelets, and present in high concentrations in central nervous system and peripheral tissues; also inhibits gastric secretions

serotonin (sirˑ··tōˈ·nin),

n neuroendocrine chemical responsible for reducing irritability, depression, and brain function.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]

serotonin (ser´ətō´nin),

n (enteramine, thrombocytin), a local vasoconstrictor (5-hydroxytryptamine) and general hypotensive agent synthesized from tryptophan and found in tissues, rather than being transferred by blood to sites of action. Most serotonin is found in the gastrointestinal tract, although the kidney, liver, and brain also produce it. It is absorbed by platelets from the site of tissue damage, where it aids hemostasis locally by vasoconstriction and systemically by reducing blood pressure.
serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective (SSRI),
n.pl. a class of antidepressant drugs such as fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, or voxamine.
serotonin serozyme

serotonin

a hormone and neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), found in many tissues, including blood platelets, intestinal mucosa, pineal body and central nervous system; it has many physiological properties, including inhibition of gastric secretion, stimulation of smooth muscles and production of vasoconstriction.

selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)
a group of compounds inhibiting serotonin reuptake in presynaptic neurons of the central nervous system; used in the treatment of mental disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a more recent study, fertilized eggs were treated immediately prior to incubation with a single dose of a serotonin obtained from a commercial company.
Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening drug reaction caused by excessive serotonergic activity in the nervous system.
Many clinical disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression share as a unifying attribute low brain serotonin.
We believe that our research offers the first evidence for the impact of serotonin pathways.
Although interfering with serotonin made mice less sensitive to itch, Chen said it's not practical to try to treat itching by trying to block the release of serotonin.
Worms genetically altered to produce more serotonin throughout their lives showed improved feeding and mating behavior and a slightly longer life span than usual, Cai and colleagues found.
The preponderance of male over female autistic children: estrogen, a similar steroid hormone, can also boost the brain levels of serotonin in girls;
Conversely, neural circuits in the barrel cortex failed to form when the mice were treated with a drug that increased serotonin signaling, suggesting that a reduction in levels of this neurotransmitter is crucial for sensory map formation.
Information extracted from identified publications included details of the method used to prepare PPP and to determine serotonin concentrations, and the values (mean, median, range) reported for free plasma or PPP serotonin along with associated SD or SE.
The serotonin hypothesis of obsessive compulsive disorder.
More studies should be done to test the sensitivity, specificity, and prognostic value of serotonin as a marker for congestive heart failure and also to investigate the therapeutic benefits of the medications affecting this pathway," noted the researchers of the cardiology department at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York.
The finding suggests that that serotonin has an active role in the progression of heart failure, researchers led by Dr.