serosa


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Related to serosa: muscularis, serosa of small intestine

serosa

 [se-ro´sah]
any serous membrane. adj., adj sero´sal.

se·ro·sa

(se-rō'să), [TA] Do not confuse this word with cirrhosis or sclerosis.
1. The outermost coat or serous layer of a visceral structure that lies in the body cavities of the abdomen or thorax; it consists of a surface layer of mesothelium reinforced by irregular fibroelastic connective tissue.
See also: chorion.
2. The outermost of the extraembryonic membranes that encloses the embryo and all its other membranes; it consists of somatopleure, that is, ectoderm reinforced by somatic mesoderm; the serosa of mammalian embryos is frequently called the trophoderm.
See also: chorion. Synonym(s): membrana serosa (2)
[fem. of Mod. L. serosus, serous]

serosa

/se·ro·sa/ (se-ro´sah) (se-ro´zah)
2. chorion.sero´sal

serosa

(sĭ-rō′sə, -zə)
n. pl. sero·sas or sero·sae (-sē, -zē)
1. A serous membrane, especially one that lines the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, enclosing their contents.
2. A membrane that surrounds the embryo of birds, reptiles, and many insects.

se·ro′sal (-zəl) adj.

serosa

[sirō′sə]
Etymology: L, serum
any serous membrane, such as the tunica serosa that lines the walls of body cavities and secretes a watery exudate.

serosa

A virtual connective-tissue membrane covered by a single layer of mesothelial cells, which lines body cavities (e.g., pericardium, peritoneum, pleura) and covers the outer surface of organs (e.g., heart, intestines, and lungs) present in those cavities.

se·ro·sa

(sēr-ō'să) [TA]
1. The outermost coat or serous layer of a visceral structure that lies in a body cavity (abdomen or thorax); it consists of a surface layer of mesothelium reinforced by irregular fibroelastic connective tissue.
2. The outermost of the extraembryonic membranes, which encloses the embryo and all its other membranes; it consists of ectoderm reinforced by somatic mesoderm; the serosa of mammalian embryos is frequently called the trophoderm.
Synonym(s): membrana serosa (2) .
See also: chorion
Synonym(s): membrana serosa (1) , serous membrane.
[fem. of Mod. L. serosus, serous]

serosa

  1. a SEROUS membrane such as the PERITONEUM that secretes a serum.
  2. an epithelial layer formed under the vitelline membrane in the development of the insect egg; it lays down the serosal cuticle of the egg.

se·ro·sa

(sēr-ō'să) [TA]
Outermost coat or serous layer of visceral structure that lies in body cavities of abdomen or thorax.
Synonym(s): serous membrane.
[fem. of Mod. L. serosus, serous]

serosa

any serous membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Large blood and lymphatic vessels and nerve trunks travel through the serosa (from and to the mesentery) to reach the wall of the digestive tract.
A serosa apresentava-se delgada e bem vascularizada, sendo que a camada muscular circular interna apresentava-se mais espessa em relacao a longitudinal externa.
tumors invading into or through the serosa or perirectal fat.
10% polyacrylamide-SDS gel electrophoreses, stained with Commassie Blue, showed that anionic collagen prepared from porcine serosa was characterized by the presence of two major bands associated with molecular mass of 98,000 Da and 104,000 Da [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED], corresponding to ([[Alpha].
Tumor metastases to the liver and lung are considered to be a consequence of vascular invasion, and those in the pancreatic serosa are attributed to transcoelomic spread.
The Bricker technique, initially described in the early 1950s, involves spatulating and anastomosing each ureter to the serosa of the bowel segment separately (Fig.
Marked edema with dense transmural infiltration of neutrophils extending from under the necrotic areas through the musculosa and the serosa was also seen.
Some intestinal vessels along the serosa presented with hyalinization of the walls with mild leukocytic infiltrate of neutrophils featuring vasculitis.
27) The enhancing mucosa and serosa, combined with the submucosal edema on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, fat-suppressed sequences, produces a "target" or "trilaminar" appearance of the bowel.
The ectopic pancreatic tissue is detected more frequently in the submucosa and muscularis propria layers of the gastrointestinal tract and may be observed in the sub-serosa or even in the serosa of the affected segment (2).
The radiofrequency probe penetrates the serosa of the fibroid, and then a seven-arm device is deployed to deliver heat energy (at a mean temperature of 41 [degrees] C).
Subserosal leiomyomas are located just under the uterine serosa and may be pedunculated (attached to the corpus by a narrow stalk) or sessile (broadbased).