seroconversion

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seroconversion

 [se″ro-kon-ver´zhun]
the change of a serologic test from negative to positive, indicating the development of antibodies in response to infection or immunization.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sē'rō-kon-ver'zhŭn),
Development of detectable specific antibodies in the serum as a result of infection or immunization.

seroconversion

/se·ro·con·ver·sion/ (-con-ver´zhun) the change of a seronegative test from negative to positive, indicating the development of antibodies in response to immunization or infection.

seroconversion

(sîr′ō-kən-vûr′zhən)
n.
Development of antibodies in blood serum as a result of infection or immunization.

se′ro·con·vert′ (-vûrt′) v.

seroconversion

[- kənvur′zhən]
Etymology: L, serum, whey, conversio, turned about
a change in serological test results from negative to positive as antibodies develop in reaction to an infection or vaccine.

seroconversion

Immunology The development of antibodies detectable in the serum, after exposure to a particular organism or antigen, in a person who was previously immunologically 'naive' for–ie, previously unexposed to a particular antigen; seroconversion may indicate current infection–and transmissibility of a pathogen–eg, HIV-1–seroconversion to p24 and/or p41 antibody production or HBV–seroconversion to surface antibody-HBsAb or e antibody–HBeAb production. See Seropositive. Cf Seronegative.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sēr'ō-kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
The process by which, after exposure to the etiologic agent of a disease, the blood changes from a negative to a positive serum marker for that specific disease.

Seroconversion

The change from HIV-negative to HIV-positive status during blood testing. Persons who are HIV-positive are called seroconverters.
Mentioned in: AIDS Tests

seroconversion (sirˈ·ō·kn·verˑ·zhn),

n change of serologic test results from negative to positive because of antibodies that develop in reaction to a vaccine or infection.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sēr'ō-kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
Development of detectable specific antibodies in the serum due to infection.

seroconversion (sir´ōkənvur´zhən),

n a blood test in which the amount of time required for the blood to change from seronegative to seropositive is indicative of specific diseases.

seroconversion

the development of antibodies to an infectious organism in response to natural infection or to the administration of a vaccine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many seroconversions for the studied pathogens appeared to be asymptomatic.
In 144 couples the index partner was taking combined ARVs; they accounted for over 7,000 unprotected acts of intercourse and 47 natural pregnancies but no HIV seroconversions (0 to 0.
The main outcome variable, time to seroconversion, was defined as the length of time between a participant's first clinic visit and the midpoint between the positive HIV test and the most recent negative test, plus one day.
utilise the IgG-Capture BED enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) to detect recent HIV seroconversion for the purpose of calculating HIV incidence rates.
Safety Profile Satisfactory, But Recommendation to Discontinue Trial Because of Low HIV Seroconversion Rate in Trial Population
There were no seroconversions noted in any of the mothers or babies
The experts estimated annual seroconversions among male-to-female transgendered individuals at 7.
Seroconversions for each virus continued throughout the study (Figure).
The results of this and other recent studies have raised questions concerning proximate patterns of hantavirus maintenance, seroconversions, and transmission within specific reservoir species occupying different western regions (Mills et al.
Among 26 couples with a male index case, there were four seroconversions (15%).
The study was not designed to evaluate efficacy; however, 10 seroconversions occurred in patients who did not use postexposure prophylaxis and 1 occurred in a patient who did.
The optimum duration of treatment, the durability of HBeAg seroconversions occurring during treatment, and the relationship of initial treatment response to outcomes such as hepatocellular carcinoma and decompensated cirrhosis are not known.