seroconversion

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seroconversion

 [se″ro-kon-ver´zhun]
the change of a serologic test from negative to positive, indicating the development of antibodies in response to infection or immunization.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sē'rō-kon-ver'zhŭn),
Development of detectable specific antibodies in the serum as a result of infection or immunization.

seroconversion

/se·ro·con·ver·sion/ (-con-ver´zhun) the change of a seronegative test from negative to positive, indicating the development of antibodies in response to immunization or infection.

seroconversion

(sîr′ō-kən-vûr′zhən)
n.
Development of antibodies in blood serum as a result of infection or immunization.

se′ro·con·vert′ (-vûrt′) v.

seroconversion

[- kənvur′zhən]
Etymology: L, serum, whey, conversio, turned about
a change in serological test results from negative to positive as antibodies develop in reaction to an infection or vaccine.

seroconversion

Immunology The development of antibodies detectable in the serum, after exposure to a particular organism or antigen, in a person who was previously immunologically 'naive' for–ie, previously unexposed to a particular antigen; seroconversion may indicate current infection–and transmissibility of a pathogen–eg, HIV-1–seroconversion to p24 and/or p41 antibody production or HBV–seroconversion to surface antibody-HBsAb or e antibody–HBeAb production. See Seropositive. Cf Seronegative.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sēr'ō-kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
The process by which, after exposure to the etiologic agent of a disease, the blood changes from a negative to a positive serum marker for that specific disease.

Seroconversion

The change from HIV-negative to HIV-positive status during blood testing. Persons who are HIV-positive are called seroconverters.
Mentioned in: AIDS Tests

seroconversion (sirˈ·ō·kn·verˑ·zhn),

n change of serologic test results from negative to positive because of antibodies that develop in reaction to a vaccine or infection.

se·ro·con·ver·sion

(sēr'ō-kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
Development of detectable specific antibodies in the serum due to infection.

seroconversion (sir´ōkənvur´zhən),

n a blood test in which the amount of time required for the blood to change from seronegative to seropositive is indicative of specific diseases.

seroconversion

the development of antibodies to an infectious organism in response to natural infection or to the administration of a vaccine.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the Editor: In our earlier assessment of the etiologic role of human bocavirus 1 (HBoVl) among 109 constitutionally healthy children, seroconversion measured by a standard IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was the prime marker of acute infection, and signs and symptoms during sampling intervals were interpreted from hand-written questionnaires and study nurse notes (1).
Treatment was continued for another 4 weeks, when HBs and HBe seroconversions were recorded, with undetectable HBV-DNA and normal liver tests: bilirubin 2.
In 144 couples the index partner was taking combined ARVs; they accounted for over 7,000 unprotected acts of intercourse and 47 natural pregnancies but no HIV seroconversions (0 to 0.
The main outcome variable, time to seroconversion, was defined as the length of time between a participant's first clinic visit and the midpoint between the positive HIV test and the most recent negative test, plus one day.
Of those seven, three reported high-risk behavior after starting nPEP, so the seroconversion in these patients may not be entirely due to medication failure.
Analysis of the data showed that 100% of the seroconversions in the isolation room occurred in patients referred from Hospital Sao Paulo, and the 2 seroconversions in the room for susceptible patients occurred in patients recently transferred from the isolation room.
There were no seroconversions noted in any of the mothers or babies
SEATTLE -- Anticipatory prescribing of antiviral medications to high-risk men for postexposure prophylaxis may reduce the rate of HIV seroconversion, Dr.
The experts estimated annual seroconversions among male-to-female transgendered individuals at 7.
The needles used for blood collection, or phlebotomy, have been shown by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) studies to account for almost 40% of CDC documented occupational HIV seroconversions.
7% for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR), respectively; however, no seroconversions were observed (4).
Among 26 couples with a male index case, there were four seroconversions (15%).