sequestrum


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Related to sequestrum: involucrum

sequestrum

 [se-kwes´trum] (L.)
1. a piece of dead bone that has become separated from sound bone during the process of necrosis.
2. any tissue that has become sequestered.

se·ques·trum

, pl.

se·ques·tra

(sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră),
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

/se·ques·trum/ (se-kwes´trum) pl. seques´tra   [L.]
1. any sequestered tissue.
2. a piece of dead bone separated from the sound bone in necrosis.
Formation of a sequestrum: (A), sound bone; (B), new bone; (C), granulations lining involucrum; (D), cloaca; (E), sequestrum.

sequestrum

(sĭ-kwĕs′trəm)
n. pl. seques·tra (-trə)
A fragment of dead bone separated from healthy bone as a result of injury or disease.

sequestrum

[sikwes′trəm] pl. sequestra
Etymology: L, a deposit
a fragment of dead bone that is partially or entirely detached from the surrounding or adjacent healthy bone.

sequestrum

Orthopedics A plug of necrotic bone separated from viable bone. See Button sequestrum, Kissing sequestrum.

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

A piece of dead, often detached, bone lying within a cavity or abscess. Sequestra usually form as a result of long-term OSTEOMYELITIS.

sequestrum

piece of diseased/non-viable bone, separated from surrounding healthy bone; characteristic of chronic osteomyelitis; sequestrum may exfoliate through overlying soft tissues

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
Piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum (sēkwes´trum),

n a piece of dead bone that has become separated from vital bone. See also osteoradionecrosis.
Enlarge picture
Sequestrum.

sequestrum

pl. sequestra [L.] a piece of dead tissue that has become separated during the process of necrosis from sound tissue; refers usually to bone, but occurs also in cornea and lung.

feline corneal sequestrum
see corneal sequestrum.
lung sequestrum
a critical feature in the epidemiology of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia; the sequestrum provides a long-term source of the causative bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The etiology and pathophysiology of feline corneal sequestrum (FCS) is unclear (Cullen et al.
Radiograph revealed extensive destruction in diaphyseal and distal metaphyseal region of left humerus along with sequestrum separated from normal bone and lying within a lucent lesion (Figure 1).
Potential Treatments: Surgical intervention (debridement, bone grafts, sequestrum removal, and implant removal).
Superficial osteitis and sequestrum formation as a result of skin avulsion in the horse.
Kern, is corneal sequestrum, a condition characterized by the formation of a black or dark brown plaque on the corneal surface, possibly the result of viral or bacterial infection.
The typical presentation upon referral was an extraction site that failed to heal and exposed alveolar bone that progressed to formation of sequestrum, with associated localized swelling and purulent exudate.
Radiographic findings of osteomyelitis (including sequestrum, involcrum, cloaca, sinus tract, and bone abscess) and septic arthritis are usually delayed after the clinical onset of infection.
Stage 3 (10-14 days) is characterized by the "classical picture" of involucrum and sequestrum, he said.
13) CT will detect lytic areas within the diploe that contain soft tissue; the soft tissue is usually homogeneous, but it can include a bony sequestrum.
Since no antibiotic seemed capable of halting the infection, we presumed that it was caused by a sequestrum, the medical term for a piece of dead bone trapped between healthy parts.
Comparison of the results of sinus track culture and sequestrum culture in chronic osteomyelitis.
On radiography, anteroposterior, lateral, and skyline views of the knee joint showed a lytic lesion in the lower pole of the patella medially with sclerosis containing a hazy flaky sequestrum (Fig.