sequestrum


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Related to sequestrum: involucrum

sequestrum

 [se-kwes´trum] (L.)
1. a piece of dead bone that has become separated from sound bone during the process of necrosis.
2. any tissue that has become sequestered.

se·ques·trum

, pl.

se·ques·tra

(sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră),
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

/se·ques·trum/ (se-kwes´trum) pl. seques´tra   [L.]
1. any sequestered tissue.
2. a piece of dead bone separated from the sound bone in necrosis.
Formation of a sequestrum: (A), sound bone; (B), new bone; (C), granulations lining involucrum; (D), cloaca; (E), sequestrum.

sequestrum

(sĭ-kwĕs′trəm)
n. pl. seques·tra (-trə)
A fragment of dead bone separated from healthy bone as a result of injury or disease.

sequestrum

[sikwes′trəm] pl. sequestra
Etymology: L, a deposit
a fragment of dead bone that is partially or entirely detached from the surrounding or adjacent healthy bone.

sequestrum

Orthopedics A plug of necrotic bone separated from viable bone. See Button sequestrum, Kissing sequestrum.

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

A piece of dead, often detached, bone lying within a cavity or abscess. Sequestra usually form as a result of long-term OSTEOMYELITIS.

sequestrum

piece of diseased/non-viable bone, separated from surrounding healthy bone; characteristic of chronic osteomyelitis; sequestrum may exfoliate through overlying soft tissues

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
Piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum (sēkwes´trum),

n a piece of dead bone that has become separated from vital bone. See also osteoradionecrosis.
Enlarge picture
Sequestrum.

sequestrum

pl. sequestra [L.] a piece of dead tissue that has become separated during the process of necrosis from sound tissue; refers usually to bone, but occurs also in cornea and lung.

feline corneal sequestrum
see corneal sequestrum.
lung sequestrum
a critical feature in the epidemiology of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia; the sequestrum provides a long-term source of the causative bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The persistence of infection might be explained by a questionable initial antimicrobial drug regimen but also by spore formation and/or poor diffusion of antimicrobial drugs, as suggested by the presence of necrotic tissues such as the bone sequestrum.
A CT scan was obtained in this case, which revealed contained osteolytic lesion with flaky sequestrum in patella (Fig.
1) The typical sequestrum is a longitudinally oriented fragment arising from the inner surface of the native osseous cortex.
The interdental bone subsequently became exposed and was removed as a 3 mm by 6 mm sequestrum leaving a bony and soft tissue defect.
Improvement of the osteomyelitis may also have been facilitated by the biopsy procedure, during which a sequestrum of bone was removed.
A floating bone sequestrum was seen on the floor of the outer part of the external auditory canal and was undermined partly by skin.
Presenting symptoms have been reported relatively consistently throughout the literature, with patients typically complaining of a painful, "non-healing" extraction socket or exposed bone with progression to sequestrum formation associated with localized swelling and purulent discharge.
10) In addition, Mostafavi and Tornetta5 found that out of a total of 19 patients treated with a unilateral external fixator there were three malunions, one delayed union, eight (44%) pin-tract infections, two pin-tract sequestrum formations, and two late fractures after removal of the external fixation.
All patients underwent surgical debridement, which included the removal of any implanted hardware present, opening of the bony cortex, excision of sequestrum and nonviable tissue, and irrigation of the bone with at least 6 liters of fluid.