sequestration

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sequestration

 [se″kwes-tra´shun]
1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathologic process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.
pulmonary sequestration loss of connection of lung tissue, and sometimes bronchi, with the bronchial tree and pulmonary veins, the tissue receiving its arterial supply from the systemic circulation. It may be completely separated anatomically and physiologically from normally connected lung (extralobar) or contiguous to and partly surrounded by normal lung (intralobar). Called also accessory lung.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn),
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

/se·ques·tra·tion/ (se″kwes-tra´shun)
1. the formation of a sequestrum.
2. the isolation of a patient.
3. a net increase in the quantity of blood within a limited vascular area, occurring physiologically, with forward flow persisting or not, or produced artificially by the application of tourniquets.

pulmonary sequestration  loss of connection of lung tissue with the bronchial tree and the pulmonary veins.

sequestration

[sē′kwestrā′shən]
Etymology: L, sequestare, to lay aside
1 the isolation of a patient or group of patients.
2 a method of controlling hemorrhage of the head or trunk by isolating fluid in the arms and legs from the general circulation.
3 allowing blood from the systemic circulation to perfuse a nonfunctioning part of a lung.

sequestration

Medtalk
1. The development of a sequestrum. See Bronchopulmonary sequestration, Carbon sequestration, Pseudosequestration, Pulmonary sequestration.
2. The removal or isolation of a chemical, molecule, cell, or tissue from general access–eg, binding of certain proteins–eg, profilin, thymosin β4, Gc protein to G-actin to prevent polymerization. See Carbon sequestration.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

Separation and physiological isolation of a portion of dead tissue from surrounding healthy tissue. The commonest example of sequestration is the formation of a bony SEQUESTRUM as a complication of OSTEOMYELITIS.

Sequestration

A process in which the spleen withdraws some normal blood cells from circulation and holds them in case the body needs extra blood in an emergency. In hypersplenism, the spleen sequesters too many blood cells.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into body spaces so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathological process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.

feline corneal sequestration
see corneal sequestrum.
pulmonary sequestration
loss of connection of lung tissue with the bronchial tree and the pulmonary veins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bronchopulmonary sequestration presenting as recurrent pneumonia.
Incidental finding and management of intralobar sequestration of the lung in a 24-year-old man.
Since the Defense Department cannot clearly articulate what is in and what is out of its own budget request, it is clouding the picture of what continued sequestration would mean and what increased defense spending might afford the nation if reversed.
Members, understandably, take away the impression that sequestration is tough but doable for the U.
2) However, the gold standard for identifying pulmonary sequestration is angiography as it confirms the anatomy, identifies the systemic supply, and shows the venous drainage.
Similarly, extralobar sequestration may appear normal if there are no secondarily inflamed bronchi or may show the effects of chronic inflammation with a thick pleural surface covered by exudates.
Pulmonary sequestration and related congenital bronchopulmonary malformations: nomenclature and classification based on anatomical and embryologic considerations.
Relationship to intralobar pulmonary sequestration.
Congenital bronchopulmonary-foregut malformation: Pulmonary sequestration communicating with the gastrointestinal tract.
A study of pulmonary ligament arteries: Relationship to intralobar pulmonary sequestration.
It's unthinkable to Virginia, to our employment needs, but it's also unthinkable to the ability and the commitment of America to maintain our liberty, with liberty for all," Romney said during a September 8 appearance in Virginia Beach, citing a Bob Woodward book that suggests the White House came up with the sequestration deal.
The sequestration issue is a huge issue in Virginian particularly, but neither side can really get an advantage out of it because both sides agreed to this plan," said Geoffrey Skelley, a political analyst at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.