sequestration


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Related to sequestration: Pulmonary sequestration, sequestration crisis

sequestration

 [se″kwes-tra´shun]
1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathologic process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.
pulmonary sequestration loss of connection of lung tissue, and sometimes bronchi, with the bronchial tree and pulmonary veins, the tissue receiving its arterial supply from the systemic circulation. It may be completely separated anatomically and physiologically from normally connected lung (extralobar) or contiguous to and partly surrounded by normal lung (intralobar). Called also accessory lung.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn),
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

/se·ques·tra·tion/ (se″kwes-tra´shun)
1. the formation of a sequestrum.
2. the isolation of a patient.
3. a net increase in the quantity of blood within a limited vascular area, occurring physiologically, with forward flow persisting or not, or produced artificially by the application of tourniquets.

pulmonary sequestration  loss of connection of lung tissue with the bronchial tree and the pulmonary veins.

sequestration

[sē′kwestrā′shən]
Etymology: L, sequestare, to lay aside
1 the isolation of a patient or group of patients.
2 a method of controlling hemorrhage of the head or trunk by isolating fluid in the arms and legs from the general circulation.
3 allowing blood from the systemic circulation to perfuse a nonfunctioning part of a lung.

sequestration

Medtalk
1. The development of a sequestrum. See Bronchopulmonary sequestration, Carbon sequestration, Pseudosequestration, Pulmonary sequestration.
2. The removal or isolation of a chemical, molecule, cell, or tissue from general access–eg, binding of certain proteins–eg, profilin, thymosin β4, Gc protein to G-actin to prevent polymerization. See Carbon sequestration.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

Separation and physiological isolation of a portion of dead tissue from surrounding healthy tissue. The commonest example of sequestration is the formation of a bony SEQUESTRUM as a complication of OSTEOMYELITIS.

Sequestration

A process in which the spleen withdraws some normal blood cells from circulation and holds them in case the body needs extra blood in an emergency. In hypersplenism, the spleen sequesters too many blood cells.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into body spaces so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathological process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.

feline corneal sequestration
see corneal sequestrum.
pulmonary sequestration
loss of connection of lung tissue with the bronchial tree and the pulmonary veins.
References in periodicals archive ?
In total, the House-passed budget would impose an additional (in addition to sequestration for defense being transferred to non-defense) cut of $700 billion on non-defense discretionary over the next ten years.
Although many of the respondents expressed frustration with sequestration, some physician leaders said they would support any attempt to cut back government spending, despite the potential consequences.
Each of the four times Gallup has asked Americans about the impact of sequestration on the country, about half have felt unsure.
It indicated that "specifically, OMB calculates that, over the course of the fiscal year, the sequestration requires a 7.
While last-minute deals are common in Washington, and both parties have expressed opposition to the cuts, the looming deadline has heightened the possibility that sequestration will be enacted.
After narrowly avoiding the dreaded "fiscal cliff," which would have would have slashed about $656 million in grant funds to Texas, according to The Dallas Morning News, another potential crisis looms: sequestration.
That means going through with sequestration is just the beginning.
The company has been waiting for an opportunity to finance a carbon sequestration project in Qatar.
He doesn't want to be in the position of having to pick up the pieces from sequestration going into effect," he said.
If no budget sequestration is done, there is danger of default, Prime Minister Jantoro Satybaldiev said at the plenary session of the Parliament on October 31 when asked by parliamentarians about this issue.
The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) report noted that the estimates are preliminary; the true magnitude of the cuts won't be known until sequestration actually occurs.
The OMB report also noted that the estimates are preliminary; the true magnitude of the cuts won't be known until sequestration actually occurs.