septicemic


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sep·ti·ce·mic

(sep'ti-sē'mik),
Relating to, suffering from, or resulting from septicemia.

septicemic

sep·ti·ce·mic

(sep'ti-sē'mik)
Relating to, suffering from, or resulting from septicemia.
Synonym(s): septicaemic.

septicemic

emanating from or pertaining to septicemia. See also septicemic colibacillosis, leptospirosis, listeriosis, pasteurellosis, salmonellosis.

septicemic cutaneous ulcerative disease (SCUD)
disease of reptiles and amphibians caused by Citrobacter freundii. Characterized by cutaneous ulceration, paralysis, flaccidity and positive cultures in lesions and blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bubonic plague can progress to septicemic plague if bacteria move from the lymphatic into the circulatory system.
Mortality rates were highest among patients with septicemic (89%) and pneumonic (93%) forms of infection (Table 2).
PEP should be recommended for laboratory manipulations or incidents that result in exposure to aerosols or droplets or contact with nonintact skin and for persons with risk factors for septicemic disease.
However, intentional release should be considered as a cause of cases occurring outside an area where plague is endemic, particularly for patients with primary pneumonic or primary septicemic plague.
pestis, whereas body lice collected from septicemic patients were positive according to guinea pig inoculation results (2).
Initially patients have symptoms of epigastric tenderness, vomiting and may progress to peritonitis and septicemic shock.
The 13-year-old patient (patient 1) had a septicemic syndrome 2 days after admission and died on June 11 despite intensive care.
Leptospirosis can be a bi-phasic disease with an acute septicemic phase and a secondary phase of severe disease characterized by jaundice, renal failure, hemorrhage, or hemodynamic collapse (7).
On admission If patient presents in septicemic shock state, those patients were started on board spectrum antibiotics (i.
Toward the end of the fourteenth century, the epidemic had abated but not disappeared; outbreaks of pneumonic and septicemic plague occurred in different cities during the next 350 years (8).
In 1996, five cases of human plague, of which two were fatal, were reported in the United States; both decedents had septicemic plague that was not diagnosed until after they died.
Increased prevalence of extended spectrum beta lactamase producers in neonatal septicemic cases at a tertiary referral hospital.