septicemia


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septicemia

 [sep″tĭ-se´me-ah]
the presence of infective agents or their toxins in the bloodstream, popularly known as blood poisoning. It is characterized by elevated body temperature, chills, and weakness. Small abscesses may form on the surface of the body and red and blue streaks become apparent along the pathway of surface blood vessels leading to and from the site of the primary infection. A blood culture confirms the diagnosis and helps identify the most effective antiinfective drug for therapy. This is a serious condition that must be treated promptly; otherwise the process of infection leads to circulatory collapse, profound shock, and death. adj., adj septice´mic.
cryptogenic septicemia septicemia in which the focus of infection is not evident during life.
puerperal septicemia puerperal fever.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă),
Systemic disease caused by the spread of microorganisms and their toxins through circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
See also: pyemia, bacteremia.
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]

septicemia

/sep·ti·ce·mia/ (sep″tĭ-se´me-ah) blood poisoning; systemic disease associated with the presence and persistence of pathogenic microorganisms or their toxins in the blood.septice´mic
cryptogenic septicemia  septicemia in which the focus of infection is not evident during life.
puerperal septicemia  see under fever.

septicemia

(sĕp′tĭ-sē′mē-ə)
n.
Systemic infection of the blood by pathogenic microorganisms, especially bacteria, that originate from a localized source. Also called blood poisoning.

sep′ti·ce′mic (-mĭk) adj.

septicemia

[sep′tisē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, septikos + haima, blood
systemic infection in which pathogens are present in the circulating blood, having spread from an infection in any part of the body. It is diagnosed by culture of the blood and is vigorously treated with antibiotics. Characteristically, septicemia causes fever, chill, hypotension, prostration, pain, headache, nausea, or diarrhea. Also spelled septicaemia. Also called blood poisoning. Compare bacteremia. See also septic shock. septicemic, adj.

septicemia

Infectious disease A rapidly progressive, life-threatening infection characterized by bacteremia which may be 2º to local infection of respiratory, GI, or GU tracts, associated with osteomyelitis, meningitis, or infection of other tissues; it may rapidly lead to septic shock, death Clinical Onset heralded by spiking fever, chills, tachypnea, tachycardia, toxic appearance, sense of impending doom; Sx rapidly progress to shock–hypothermia, hypotension, changed mental status, clotting defects–eg, petechiae, ecchymosis; if caused by N meningococcus, shock, adrenal collapse, DIC. See Sepsis syndrome.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă )
A systemic disease caused by multiplication of microorganisms in circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
See also: pyemia
Synonym(s): septic fever, septicaemia.
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]

Septicemia

The medical term for blood poisoning, in which bacteria have invaded the bloodstream and circulates throughout the body.

septicemia (sepˈ·t·sēˑ·mē·),

n the presence of virulent microorganisms or their toxins in the bloodstream; characterized by chill, fever, prostration, hypotension, headache, or pain. Also called
blood poisoning.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă)
Systemic disease caused by the spread of microorganisms and their toxins through circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]

septicemia (sep´tisē´mēə),

n a condition in which pathogenic bacteria and bacterial toxins circulate in the blood. Manifestations include high temperature, leukocytosis, malaise, rapid pulse, and subsequent diffuse systemic degenerative disturbances.

septicemia

systemic disease associated with the presence and persistence of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins in the blood. The resulting syndrome is a combination of the signs of toxemia and hyperthermia, i.e. fever, mucosal and conjunctival petechiation and evidence of localization in joints, eyes, meninges, heart valves. Proof is by positive blood culture or smear. See also specific infections, e.g. anthrax, pasteurellosis, colibacillosis. Called also blood poisoning.

bacterial hemorrhagic septicemia
includes many bacterial diseases of fish, e.g. vibriosis, but usually restricted to systemic infection by opportunists such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas spp.
cryptogenic septicemia
septicemia in which the focus of infection is not evident during life.
foal septicemia
rapidly fatal septicemia of the newborn foal caused by Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, β-hemolytic streptococcus.
hemorrhagic septicemia
septicemia characterized by marked petechiation on mucosae and serosae. Also used as a specific name for septicemic pasteurellosis in cattle; see hemorrhagic septicemia.
puerperal septicemia
that in which the focus of infection is a lesion of the mucous membrane received during parturition.
puppy septicemia
puppies normal at birth, weaken and die after the first 24 hours. The usual causes are infection by hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli and Brucella canis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic liver disease and consumption of raw oysters: a potentially lethal combination--a review of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia.
vulnificus infection across the gastrointestinal mucosa could have produced primary septicemia complicated by secondary cellulitis progressing to necrotizing fasciitis.
For each country, in addition to test volume and sales projections, the DataPack includes the 2010 sales and market share estimates for major suppliers of Septicemia tests.
All of these surveys included a detailed review of randomly selected medical charts by highly qualified surveyors (physicians and nurses) to determine whether the clinical indicators of septicemia were present and resulted in findings that there was no evidence to support the allegations of Medicare fraud.
Chromobacterium violaceum infection in children: a case of fatal septicemia with nasopharyngeal abscess and literature review.
The Rheonix SeptiCARD, however, is able to take a whole blood sample and complete an accurate detection of bacteria in the blood, or septicemia, in less than three hours on a fully automated and closed system.
pseudotuberculosis septicemia have been reported thus far, mainly in patients with underlying conditions such as hepatic cirrhosis, malignancy, diabetes, aplastic anemia, thalassemia, and iron overload (1,4,5).
Blood volume derangements are also often common in kidney failure, septicemia, and anemia.
It would be unconscionable to put more patients at risk, especially the frail elderly susceptible to life-threatening infections like septicemia, by allowing Prime Healthcare to operate more hospitals without a thorough investigation of both its patient care and billing practices," said Dave Regan, SEIU-UHW trustee.
The disease has been called the great mimicker, with a wide range of clinical syndromes including pneumonia, visceral abscesses, soft tissue infections, septic arthritis, and septicemia (1,3,5).
Potential indications for future development plans include uncomplicated and complicated skin and superficial skin structure infections, septicemia, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis due to staphylococcus.
tertium is being increasingly reported as a human pathogen (3-9), and the strongest association has been with septicemia in patients with neutropenia and hematologic malignancies (3,4).