sensualism


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sen·su·al·ism

(sen'shū-ăl-izm),
1. Domination by the emotions.
2. Indulgence in sensory pleasures.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling, fr. sentio, to feel]

sensualism

(sĕn′shū-ăl-ĭzm)
The state of being sensual, in which one's actions are dominated by the emotions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
large disapproved of the excessive sensualism and supposed debauchery of
10) Gilberto Freyre, "Brazil", subtitle: Youth and Social and Political Reform: Notwithstanding the fact that they were young and prone to sensualism of the body as well as to excesses of the mind, bachelors of arts and lawyers, educated in Europe or according to the new theories and methods, became the censors of their elders' sexual excesses, which in Brazil were a substitute, especially in the plantations, for more refined tastes or interests of an intellectual nature.
the exasperated sensualism, the learned debauchery of Petronius, the feverish inspiration of Apuleius, the amorous sighs of Tibullus.
Recent studies of the later Enlightenment have stressed the role of British sensualism in its thinking; indeed, the later Enlightenment is sometimes presented as the triumph of British sensualism over its continental, rationalist rivals.
In his quest to embody the beautiful, he apparently seeks to sanctify his own mechanism--his erotic body--for in moments of frustration he several times discloses a tendency toward sensualism.
Sensualism is the metaphysical doctrine that, along with a naive realism, hides behind the classic version.
The French seem to be unable to create connections between perceptions and the abstractions of the mind: either all is abstract as in the rhetoric of their tragedies, or there is but a free-floating succession of unconnected perceptions, a fault Hazlitt usually attributes to British philosophy from Hobbesian sensualism to Hartley's associationalism.
The riddles contained in the concepts of cause, substance, law, and unit, are concealed behind our assumption of a law-like connection that our senses do not reveal to us and that consequently drive us beyond the seductive sensualism.
Added to these are moral factors: the corruptive influence of autocratic power (Caligula, Nero, and their ilk), the corrosive effects of sensualism (private orgies and seductive spas), the dehumanizing effects of institutionalized slavery, the disappearance of former virtues (chiefly self-reliance and self-sacrifice), and the enervation and distraction induced by Christianity's emphasis on brotherly love and otherworldly hope.
The Neoclassical axiology, on which much of the English writer's worldview is based, reacts against the sensualism, hedonism and even eroticism of Rococo aesthetics and moral values, while calling for a virile and rationalist code that encourages virtue, strength, renunciation and chastity (Chezaud 1999: 257).
Then there was antipathy to any more striking emphasis on the sensual effects of music, sensualism, in this country mainly designated by the term "hedonism".
In her own life and in the life of her fictional protagonist, Ellen Montgomery, Warner embraced punitive literacy practices (prolonged reading of difficult material, reading without movement, and so forth) as a way of countering the sensualism she often associated with books.