sensory substitution


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sensory substitution

a technique in which one sense, for example, touch, is used to retrain perceptual centers with lost sensors, for example, balance, in rehabilitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
He is considered as the first to propose the concept of sensory substitution to treat patients with disabilities, often those caused by neurological problems.
Addition of dynamic head tilt movements to sensory organization test protocols might provide a useful enhancement, especially in evaluating subjects with extensive balance control performance who can compensate with increased task vigilance or sensory substitution.
Middleton, Wisconsin) employs the concept of sensory substitution by enabling tactile perception of information ordinarily processed by the visual system.
We hypothesized that rehabilitation therapy based on sensory-motor stimulation could contribute to acquisition of compensative strategies to improve gait, given the important role that the visual and proprioceptive deprivation has in sensory substitution [23].
KEYWORDS: sensory substitution, visual prosthesis, visual to sound, blindness, neuroplasticity, medicine, technology
This new multisensory perspective on such aids (called sensory substitution devices) could make tasks that were previously attention-consuming much easier, allowing nonsighted people to acquire a new sensory functionality similar to vision.
Haptic feedback aims at restoring sensory presence through force feedback or by sensory substitution (e.
Eagleman calls this the PH (Potato Head) model of evolution, he goes on to say that "Our best proof of principle of this comes from what's called sensory substitution.
Cross modal plasticity refers to the capacity of the brain to replace the functions of a lost part by another part, the most commonly used form of sensory substitution is Braille reading.
She found it was the perfect combination of science and creativity and used those skills on her senior project to create a Sensory Substitution Glove for the Visually Impaired.
The device depends on sensory substitution which involves feeding information from one sense into another.
Since 2007, Amedi, of the Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences and the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Medicine, has led research that uses sensory substitution devices (SSDs) to receive data input in the form of sound, enabling the blind to "see" what they are hearing.