sensory integrative therapy

sensory integrative therapy

therapy that involves sensory stimulation and adaptive responses to it according to a child's neurological needs. Treatment usually involves full body movements that provide vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile stimulation. It usually does not include desk activities, speech training, reading lessons, or training in specific perceptual or motor skills. The goal is to improve the brain's ability to process and organize sensations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the early research addressed children with learning disabilities, with the expectation that underlying academic performance would improve with sensory integrative therapy (Vargas & Camilli, 1999).
Sensory integrative therapy is usually conducted by occupational therapists and treatment is costly, with intervention sometimes lasting more than a year (Vargas & Camilli, 1999).
Baranek's recommendation supporting the cautious use of sensory integrative therapy seems unjustifiable given the number of studies examined, acknowledged flaws, and inconsistent treatment effects.
The end point of this line of reasoning is demonstrated by Miller (2003) with an argument that amounts to the justification of continued clinical use of sensory integrative therapy on the basis of a perceived lack of interpretable scientific evidence.