sensory cell


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Related to sensory cell: Sensory nerve cell

sen·so·ry cell

a cell in the peripheral nervous system that receives afferent (sensory) input; sensory receptor cells.

sensory cell

A cell that when stimulated gives rise to nerve impulses that are conveyed to the central nervous system.
See also: cell

sensory cell

  1. see SENSORY NEURON.
  2. a modified cell adapted for the acceptance and transmission of stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sensory cells of the tentacles of Haliotis are not subepithlial as in pulmonate mollusks (Wright 1974), but are part of the epithelium similar to that in P.
Understanding this process could lead to a way to regenerate sensory cells in humans, which can possibly restore hearing in people now deaf, Dr.
The process is largely passive, although control over the middle-ear muscles, the iris or flaring of the nostrils, can alter the flow of energy to the sensory cells.
Elucidation of the cellular, molecular, and biochemical and sensory processing mechanisms governing the proliferative, regenerative, lineage determination, and developmental capacities of these sensory cells and tissues.
Dogs have an extraordinary number of olfactory sensory cells (220 million in a sheep dog, compared to 6-10 million in humans), enabling them to smell 44-100 times better than human beings/Although law enforcement agencies have used a number of breeds in police work, the bloodhound, with its keen sense of smell and innate determination, remains the best suited for locating individuals and evidence.
And our skin, which has about 50 touch receptors for every square centimeter and about 5 million sensory cells overall, is hungry for touch.
That's because taste buds made of sensory cells on your tongue detect only four primary tastes--sweet, salty, bitter, and sour (and possibly a fifth "meaty" taste).
The exposed part of these sensory cells are hair-like offshoots called cilia, which are surrounded by liquid within the balance organs of the inner ear and send a signal to the brain when they are swished about by the head changing positions.
In studying 80 chinchillas the researchers found that although the animals lose about 1 percent of the sensory cells in their ears with each year of life, their hearing sensitivity remains normal.
These show the similarities in the molecular architecture and in the physiology of sensory cells across species and across sensory modality and often indicate a common ancestry dating back over half a billion years.
Current evidence indicates that pigeons employ a magnetoreceptor that is associated with the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and the vestibular system, but the sensory cells remain undiscovered.
A remarkable characteristic of these sensory cells is that they regularly regenerate.