sensory

(redirected from sensorily)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to sensorily: sensorially

sensory

 [sen´sŏ-re]
pertaining to sensation or to the response of the senses (hearing, sight, touch, etc.) to incoming stimuli.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏ-rē),
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory

/sen·so·ry/ (sen´sor-e) pertaining to sensation.

sensory

(sĕn′sə-rē)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the senses or sensation.
2. Transmitting impulses from sense organs to nerve centers; afferent.

sensory

[sen′sərē]
Etymology: L, sentire to feel
1 pertaining to sensation.
2 pertaining to a part or all of the body's sensory nerve network.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

Sensory

Refers to peripheral nerves that transmit information from the senses to the brain.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

sensory

strictly, applies only to the reception and processing by the nervous system of information from the outside world such that it reaches consciousness as a subjective experience (sensation); often used loosely in relation to any afferent nerve pathway or process, including those serving only reflex function.

sensory

relating to sensation (Table 1)
Table 1: Afferent sensory impulses from the skin and superficial tissues
SensationSpecialized nerve endingSubserving nerve fibre
Light touchMeissner's corpusclesA-beta
VibrationPacinian corpusclesA-beta
Positional awarenessJoint proprioceptors
Golgi tendon organs
Muscle stretch receptors
A-beta
Sharp painFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal and thermo/mechanical nociceptors)A-delta
Dull pain/acheFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal nociceptors)C
TemperatureFree nerve endings (high-threshold thermal nociceptors)C

sensory,

adj pertaining to the senses (smelling, tasting, touching, hearing, or seeing).

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory (sen´sərē),

n that part of the nervous system that receives and perceives sensations such as sound, touch, smell, sight, pain, heat, cold, and vibration.
sensory innervation,
n the distribution of nerves to an organ, muscle, or other body part conveying sensation to that area.
sensory threshold,
n the point at which a stimulus triggers the start of an afferent nerve impulse. Absolute threshold is the lowest point at which response to a stimulus can be perceived.

sensory

pertaining to sensation.

equine sensory ataxia
see enzootic equine incoordination.
sensory input
produced by sensory organs and transmitted by afferent nerve fibers to the central nervous system. See also sense.
sensory nerve
a peripheral nerve that conducts impulses from a sense organ to the spinal cord or brain; called also afferent nerve. See also nerve.
sensory neuropathy
see hereditary sensory neuropathy.
sensory paralytic urinary bladder
see atonic neurogenic urinary bladder.
sensory perceptivity
the ability to perceive, to feel. Tests for this in animals are based on the assumption that the observer can differentiate between a reflex response and a central perception.
sensory receptor
see sensory receptor.
References in periodicals archive ?
A telling instance of this manipulation is the absence of the material setting, but its main manifestation is the structure of Goethe's fictional person: "Nicht die sinnlich-wahrnembare, leibhaftige Seite der Personen soll hier die grosstmogliche Bestimmtheit erreichen, sondern das Sittlich-Charakterliche" ("Here, the highest possible definiteness is achieved not in the sensorily perceptible, physical side of the characters, but in their moral traits").
This reflection was enhanced by pondering the parallels between the discovery of new personal meaning in clinical psychological work and discovering sensorily unavailable meaning in the parapsychology experiment (Carpenter, 1988), as well as parallels between research in subliminal perception and in extrasensory perception.
2) It is upon the individuality and actuality of the sensorily given that empiricist nominalism bases itself.
The look of the other is not simply sensorily there, fully present; but the full presence expresses the inner orientation of the animal.
Such science thereby tends to fall into what I have called the empiriomorphic fallacy, considering all things in the form presented by a sensorily observable object.
Thus the thesis itself that knowledge is sensation is presented sensorily in speech; it is an example of [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which turns out to be false; and both theses are worked out by "giving an account.
Socrates continually calls attention to the distinction between the sensorily perceived and the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] present therein.
We actually run through the repertoire when we begin with the sensorily given, apply a general category and still narrower categories as the evidence becomes clearer, until we arrive at the proper fit between the category and the individual given.