sensory

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Related to sensorily: sensorially

sensory

 [sen´sŏ-re]
pertaining to sensation or to the response of the senses (hearing, sight, touch, etc.) to incoming stimuli.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏ-rē),
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory

/sen·so·ry/ (sen´sor-e) pertaining to sensation.

sensory

(sĕn′sə-rē)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the senses or sensation.
2. Transmitting impulses from sense organs to nerve centers; afferent.

sensory

[sen′sərē]
Etymology: L, sentire to feel
1 pertaining to sensation.
2 pertaining to a part or all of the body's sensory nerve network.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

Sensory

Refers to peripheral nerves that transmit information from the senses to the brain.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

sensory

strictly, applies only to the reception and processing by the nervous system of information from the outside world such that it reaches consciousness as a subjective experience (sensation); often used loosely in relation to any afferent nerve pathway or process, including those serving only reflex function.

sensory

relating to sensation (Table 1)
Table 1: Afferent sensory impulses from the skin and superficial tissues
SensationSpecialized nerve endingSubserving nerve fibre
Light touchMeissner's corpusclesA-beta
VibrationPacinian corpusclesA-beta
Positional awarenessJoint proprioceptors
Golgi tendon organs
Muscle stretch receptors
A-beta
Sharp painFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal and thermo/mechanical nociceptors)A-delta
Dull pain/acheFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal nociceptors)C
TemperatureFree nerve endings (high-threshold thermal nociceptors)C

sensory,

adj pertaining to the senses (smelling, tasting, touching, hearing, or seeing).

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory (sen´sərē),

n that part of the nervous system that receives and perceives sensations such as sound, touch, smell, sight, pain, heat, cold, and vibration.
sensory innervation,
n the distribution of nerves to an organ, muscle, or other body part conveying sensation to that area.
sensory threshold,
n the point at which a stimulus triggers the start of an afferent nerve impulse. Absolute threshold is the lowest point at which response to a stimulus can be perceived.

sensory

pertaining to sensation.

equine sensory ataxia
see enzootic equine incoordination.
sensory input
produced by sensory organs and transmitted by afferent nerve fibers to the central nervous system. See also sense.
sensory nerve
a peripheral nerve that conducts impulses from a sense organ to the spinal cord or brain; called also afferent nerve. See also nerve.
sensory neuropathy
see hereditary sensory neuropathy.
sensory paralytic urinary bladder
see atonic neurogenic urinary bladder.
sensory perceptivity
the ability to perceive, to feel. Tests for this in animals are based on the assumption that the observer can differentiate between a reflex response and a central perception.
sensory receptor
see sensory receptor.
References in periodicals archive ?
What follows the "here" of line 38, be it visionarily imagined or sensorily described, likewise fails to uphold its promise of actuality.
Goodman insists that there is always (eventually) a discernible difference marking a genuine artwork, but it is restricted to what is no more than sensorily discernible; and Danto insists that what distinguishes one artwork from another or from things that are not artworks at all is something that is not in principle perceptually (sensorily) discernible.
Arguments which are visually, and perhaps more generally sensorily, present are less susceptible to the deconstructive turn in linguistic representation: as sensations, they simply are.
To explain this another way, it is possible of two persons, A and B, that each one is making assumptions that are not salient to both, so that neither know exactly what it is that is sensorily included in his or her percept that is not included in the other's.
This success is not just for us, of course, but it is at least for us; as such it must be cashed out in terms of what we observe and are sensorily influenced by, and not solely in terms of what abstractly we can think.
In contrast, men with a visual dysfunction and sensorily impaired women were not at increased risk.
Most research has been conducted with student populations although there are a few studies of sensorily impaired children and adults (Bender & Levin, 1978; Burger & Blackman, 1978; Greeson & Jens, 1977; Ross & Ross, 1978).
Vivid information is theorized to be easier to recall, because of emotional affect and the greater amount of sensorily interesting detail associated with vivid information.
To a first approximation, we can understand phenomenal evidence as determined by how our environment sensorily seems to us when we are experiencing.
Depending on volume, costs range from about 30 cents per gallon on up to a dollar or more--not a cost anybody would willingly incur, but well worth it to give a sensorily challenged wine a fighting chance in the marketplace.
In the first place, Wordsworth emphasizes the panorama's capacity to engage the subject both sensorily and intellectually.