sensitive

(redirected from sensitiveness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sensitive

 [sen´sĭ-tiv]
1. able to receive or respond to stimuli.
2. unusually responsive to stimulation, or responding quickly and acutely.

sen·si·tive

(sen'si-tiv), Avoid the misspelling sensative.
1. Capable of perceiving sensations.
2. Responsive to a stimulus.
3. Acutely perceptive of interpersonal situations.
4. One who is readily hypnotizable.
5. Readily undergoing a chemical change, with but slight change in environmental conditions, as a sensitive reagent.
6. In immunology, denoting: a sensitized antigen; or a human (or animal) rendered susceptible to immunologic reactions by previous exposure to the antigen concerned.
Synonym(s): sensible (3)

sensitive

/sen·si·tive/ (sen´sĭ-tiv)
1. able to receive or respond to stimuli.
2. unusually responsive to stimulation, or responding quickly and acutely.

sensitive

(sĕn′sĭ-tĭv)
adj.
1. Capable of perceiving with a sense or senses.
2. Responsive to external conditions or to a stimulus.
3. Easily irritated.
4. Susceptible to slight changes or differences in the environment.
5. Predisposed to inflammation as a result of preexisting allergy or disease.
6. Registering slight differences or changes of condition. Used of an instrument.

sensitive

[sen′sitiv]
Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 able to perceive and transmit a sensation or stimulus.
2 affected by low concentrations of antimicrobial drugs, said of microorganisms.
3 abnormally susceptible to a subject, such as a drug or foreign protein.

sen·si·tive

(sen'si-tiv)
1. Capable of perceiving sensations.
2. Responding to a stimulus.
3. Acutely perceptive of interpersonal situations.
4. One who is readily hypnotizable.
5. Readily undergoing a chemical change, with but slight change in environmental conditions, as a sensitive reagent.
6. immunology Denoting: 1) a sensitized antigen; 2) a person (or animal) rendered susceptible to immunologic reactions by previous exposure to the antigen concerned.
7. microbiology Denoting a microorganism that is susceptible to inhibition or destruction by a given antimicrobial agent.
Synonym(s): sensible (3) .

sensitive

reacting violently to the effects of a PATHOGEN.

sensitive

capable of perceiving sensation/responsive to stimuli

sen·si·tive

(sen'si-tiv)
1. Capable of perceiving sensations.
2. Responsive to a stimulus.
3. Acutely perceptive of interpersonal situations.
4. Readily undergoing a chemical change, with but slight change in environmental conditions.

sensitive (sen´sitiv),

adj able to receive or transmit a sensation; capable of feeling or responding to a sensation.

sensitive

1. able to receive or respond to stimuli.
2. unusually responsive to stimulation, or responding quickly and acutely.

sensitive vessel syndrome
temporary engorgement of conjunctival blood vessels in the absence of disease. Seen most commonly in small dogs and cats.

Patient discussion about sensitive

Q. I had cataract surgery with iol implant, and ever since I have awful light sensitivity. Any ideas? I can't go into a "super store" without my sunglasses. My eyes ache at the end of the day. My doctor says "I don't know!"

A. May sound a bit silly question, but have you tried to consult your ophthalmologist (eye doctor, e.g. the one that performed the operation) about it? Cataract surgery, although considered very successful, isn't problem-free. Primary physician may not have the necessary specialization to deal with these subjects.

Q. I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses? what are the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia and can they be aggravated? I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses?

A. Great answeer...couldn't agree more!

Q. when my aunt went through chemo (for colon cancer) her palms became VERY sensitive and had a burning feeling is there any way to prevent this from happening to my mom who is starting her chemo now? If not, what it the best treatment for it?

A. What you describe sounds like peripheral neuropathy, a well known side effect of platinum chemotherapy which is used for colon cancer. Several measures, including giving infusion of calcium and magnesium, and glutathione were found to reduce the rate of this complication, although further studies are necessary.

However, the information is only general advice, since I haven't examined your mother so if you have any questions about this subject, it may be wise to consult a doctor (e.g. oncologist).

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cancerchemotherapy.html

More discussions about sensitive
References in classic literature ?
Nicholas understood that something must have happened between Sonya and Dolokhov before dinner, and with the kindly sensitiveness natural to him was very gentle and wary with them both at dinner.
Never had she seen so much to respect in his appearance, so much that attracted her by its sensitiveness and intelligence, although she saw these qualities as if they were those one responds to, dumbly, in the face of a stranger.
In return for what he could tell her she brought him such curiosity and sensitiveness of perception, that he was led to doubt whether any gift bestowed by much reading and living was quite the equal of that for pleasure and pain.
Casaubon had a sensitiveness to match Dorothea's, and an equal quickness to imagine more than the fact.
The weather is seldom talked of with so much real sensitiveness to it as in this:
Or maybe to-day she sees whither I am leading her, and such is her sensitiveness that she is quite hurt.
It was altogether a new experience with him, this self-dissatisfaction and sensitiveness to criticism, which at any other time he would have regarded with a sort of insolent indifference.
The days seemed to have gone by for that over-strained sensitiveness which was continually giving rise to senseless bickerings, when every trilling breeze seemed to fan the smouldering fires of jealousy.
He was nothing--a mere bunch of flesh and nerves and sensitiveness that crawled in the muck for gold, that dreamed and aspired and gambled, and that passed and was gone.
You're nothing but a bunch of high-strung sensitiveness, with a golden heart in the middle and a golden coat wrapped all around.
This sensitiveness of the mother was the heritage that in the boy became morbid and horrible.
I had read in medical books of cases of morbid nervous sensitiveness exactly similar to the case of Miss Dunross, as described by herself--and that had been enough for me.