sensibility


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sensibility

 [sen″sĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.
deep sensibility the sensibility of deep tissue (such as muscles or tendons) to pressure, pain, and movement.
epicritic sensibility the sensibility to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature, localized in the skin.
proprioceptive sensibility the sensibility afforded by receptors in muscles, joints, and other parts, by which one is made aware of their position and state.
protopathic sensibility the sensibility to strong stimulations of pain and temperature; it is low in degree and poorly localized, existing in the skin and in the viscera, and acting as a defensive agency against pathologic changes in the tissues.
somesthetic sensibility proprioceptive sensibility.
splanchnesthetic sensibility the sensibility to stimuli received by splanchnic receptors.

sen·si·bil·i·ty

(sen'si-bil'i-tē),
The consciousness of sensation; the capability of perceiving sensible stimuli.
[L. sensibilitas]

sensibility

/sen·si·bil·i·ty/ (sen″sĭ-bil´ĭ-te) susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.
deep sensibility  sensibility to stimuli such as pain, pressure, and movement that activate receptors below the body surface but not in the viscera.
epicritic sensibility  the sensibility of the skin to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature.
proprioceptive sensibility  proprioception.
protopathic sensibility  sensibility to pain and temperature which is low in degree and poorly localized.
splanchnesthetic sensibility  visceral sense.

sensibility

[sen′sibil′itē]
the ability to perceive sensations and impressions, both physical and psychological.

sen·si·bil·i·ty

(sens'i-bil'i-tē)
The consciousness of sensation; the capability of perceiving sensible stimuli.
[L. sensibilitas]

sensibility

susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.

deep sensibility
the sensibility of deep tissue (muscle, tendon, etc.) to pressure, pain and movement.
epicritic sensibility
the sensibility to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature, localized in the skin.
proprioceptive sensibility
the sensibility afforded by receptors in muscles, joints and other parts, by which one is made aware of their position and state.
protopathic sensibility
the sensibility to strong stimulations of pain and temperature; it is low in degree and poorly localized, existing in the skin and in the viscera, and acting as a defensive agency against pathological changes in the tissues.
somatesthetic sensibility
proprioceptive sensibility.
splanchnesthetic sensibility
the sensibility to stimuli received by splanchnic receptors.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to Hobbes's recommendations, the political, moral, and aesthetic goals of the culture of sensibility coalesce in the desire for weaker central government, liberation from social conventions, and release from ineffective education and ethical norms.
In chapter 2, he explores the vocabulary of sensibility.
With this specific argument in mind, I look at what WPAs can do to "unpack" this stance of sensitivity, both by understanding its theoretical and philosophical dimensions more clearly and by taking specific initiatives to cultivate this sensibility as a positive stance towards action in the field of composition studies.
PERIOD PIECE Sense and Sensibility comes to the Empire Theatre, Consett
Follow the sisters as they fall in love, make mistakes and experience heartbreak for the first time in their quest to find a balance between sense and sensibility.
Her focus on Kant's account of sensibility allows her to bring together a great many texts that would normally not be related to one another, thus throwing new light on the continuity between Kant's pre-critical and critical works.
Fourth, as much as sensibility molded the perspectives of the men who fought the British and ruled the new country, it informed the decisions of sensible men at war.
The strongest juxtapositions at Lyon appeared in the opening passage of works at the Institut d'Art Contemporain: a soft interplay beginning with the cultural-revolution sensibility of Yoko Ono's Film No.
Sense and Sensibility is a novel about two sisters: Elinor, who uses her head, and Marianne, who is governed by her heart.
To pick up any novel from this time, from the amatory fiction of the 1710s to the sentimental and Gothic fiction of the 1790s, is to be struck by the constant presence of the tremulous body of sensibility.
The late-night program was the network's first original production aimed specifically at adults, who liked its satirical, non-sequitur sensibility.