sensibility


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sensibility

 [sen″sĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.
deep sensibility the sensibility of deep tissue (such as muscles or tendons) to pressure, pain, and movement.
epicritic sensibility the sensibility to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature, localized in the skin.
proprioceptive sensibility the sensibility afforded by receptors in muscles, joints, and other parts, by which one is made aware of their position and state.
protopathic sensibility the sensibility to strong stimulations of pain and temperature; it is low in degree and poorly localized, existing in the skin and in the viscera, and acting as a defensive agency against pathologic changes in the tissues.
somesthetic sensibility proprioceptive sensibility.
splanchnesthetic sensibility the sensibility to stimuli received by splanchnic receptors.

sen·si·bil·i·ty

(sen'si-bil'i-tē),
The consciousness of sensation; the capability of perceiving sensible stimuli.
[L. sensibilitas]

sensibility

/sen·si·bil·i·ty/ (sen″sĭ-bil´ĭ-te) susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.
deep sensibility  sensibility to stimuli such as pain, pressure, and movement that activate receptors below the body surface but not in the viscera.
epicritic sensibility  the sensibility of the skin to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature.
proprioceptive sensibility  proprioception.
protopathic sensibility  sensibility to pain and temperature which is low in degree and poorly localized.
splanchnesthetic sensibility  visceral sense.

sensibility

[sen′sibil′itē]
the ability to perceive sensations and impressions, both physical and psychological.

sen·si·bil·i·ty

(sens'i-bil'i-tē)
The consciousness of sensation; the capability of perceiving sensible stimuli.
[L. sensibilitas]

sensibility

susceptibility of feeling; ability to feel or perceive.

deep sensibility
the sensibility of deep tissue (muscle, tendon, etc.) to pressure, pain and movement.
epicritic sensibility
the sensibility to gentle stimulations permitting fine discriminations of touch and temperature, localized in the skin.
proprioceptive sensibility
the sensibility afforded by receptors in muscles, joints and other parts, by which one is made aware of their position and state.
protopathic sensibility
the sensibility to strong stimulations of pain and temperature; it is low in degree and poorly localized, existing in the skin and in the viscera, and acting as a defensive agency against pathological changes in the tissues.
somatesthetic sensibility
proprioceptive sensibility.
splanchnesthetic sensibility
the sensibility to stimuli received by splanchnic receptors.
References in classic literature ?
But this unpleasant sensibility was fitful, and left me moments of rest, when the souls of my companions were once more shut out from me, and I felt a relief such as silence brings to wearied nerves.
Nay, I was just as jealous of my brother as before--just as much irritated by his small patronizing ways; for my pride, my diseased sensibility, were there as they had always been, and winced as inevitably under every offence as my eye winced from an intruding mote.
Drowne looked at him with a visage that bore the traces of tears, but from which the light of imagination and sensibility, so recently illuminating it, had departed.
We know not how to account for the inferiority of this quaint old figure, as compared with the recorded excellence of the Oaken Lady, unless on the supposition that in every human spirit there is imagination, sensibility, creative power, genius, which, according to circumstances, may either be developed in this world, or shrouded in a mask of dulness until another state of being.
says my amiable lover; 'she eats too much--her sensibility is all stomach.
She had a great access of sensibility too that day, when obliged to go and countermand the clothes, the darling clothes on which she had set her heart for Christmas Day, and the cut and fashion of which she had arranged in many conversations with a small milliner, her friend.
To a person of similar sensibility this simple assertion will explain and excuse everything.
17) The reasons for this difference are surely national but necessarily speculative--an English emotional aversion to disaster themes (especially those too close to home) and a different religious sensibility that would have seen a "fun" ride through hell as a burlesque of religious belief rather than a reassuring (because playful) encounter with transcendent fears.
But, of course, there was a parameter to Dean's choices: her own sensibility.
7] Finally, the teaching/learning approach of religious aesthetics attempts to evaluate the aesthetic sensibility of a story, novel, or film entirely on its own terms.
On April 24, she will celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company with a six-performance retrospective of movement, sound, and decor, a two-hour digest of a career that has been instrumental in shaping the face, not to mention the limbs, torso, and sensibility, of contemporary dance on the West Coast.
We all want to have beautiful homes that reflect our personal style and sensibility.