sense


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sense

 [sens]
1. a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Five major senses were traditionally considered: vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. In addition, equilibrium, hunger, thirst, malaise, pain, and other types of senses have been distinguished. The operation of all senses involves the reception of stimuli by sense organs, each of which is sensitive to a particular kind of stimulus. The eyes are sensitive to light; the ears, to sound; the olfactory organs, to odor; and the taste buds, to taste. Various sense organs of the skin and other tissues are sensitive to touch, pain, temperature, and other sensations. On receiving stimuli, the sense organ translates them into nerve impulses that are transmitted along the sensory nerves to the brain. In the cerebral cortex, the impulses are interpreted, or perceived, as sensations. The brain associates them with other information, acts upon them, and stores them as memory. See also nervous system and brain.
2. pertaining to the sense strand of a nucleic acid.
sense of equilibrium the sense of maintenance of or divergence from an upright position, controlled by receptors in the vestibule of the ear.
kinesthetic sense muscle sense.
light sense the faculty by which degrees of brilliancy are distinguished.
muscle sense (muscular sense) the faculty by which muscular movements are perceived.
pain sense nociception.
position sense (posture sense) a variety of muscular sense by which the position or attitude of the body or its parts is perceived.
pressure sense the faculty by which pressure upon the surface of the body is perceived.
sixth sense the general feeling of consciousness of the entire body; cenesthesia.
somatic s's senses other than the special senses; these include touch, kinesthesia, nociception, pressure sense, temperature sense, and muscle sense, among others.
space sense the faculty by which relative positions and relations of objects in space are perceived.
special s's the senses of vision, hearing, taste, and smell; equilibrium is sometimes considered a special sense, but touch usually is not. See also somatic senses.
stereognostic sense the sense by which form and solidity are perceived.
temperature sense the ability to recognize differences in temperature; called also thermesthesia.

sense

(sens),
The faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense

(sens)
1. any of the physical processes by which stimuli are received, transduced, and conducted as impulses to be interpreted to the brain.
2. in molecular genetics, referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.

body sense  somatognosis.
color sense  the faculty by which colors are perceived and distinguished.
sense of equilibrium  the sense that maintains awareness of being or not being in an upright position, controlled by receptors in the vestibule of the ear.
joint sense  arthresthesia.
kinesthetic sense 
light sense  the sense by which degrees of brilliancy are distinguished.
motion sense , movement sense the awareness of motion by the head or body.
muscle sense , muscular sense
1. sensory impressions, such as movement and stretch, that come from the muscles.
pain sense  the ability to feel pain, caused by stimulation of a nociceptor.
position sense , posture sense the awareness of the position of the body or its parts in space, a combination of the sense of equilibrium and kinesthesia.
pressure sense  the sense by which pressure upon the surface of the body is perceived.
sixth sense  somatognosis.
somatic senses  senses other than the special senses, including touch, pressure, pain, and temperature, kinesthesia, muscle sense, visceral sense, and sometimes sense of equilibrium.
space sense  the sense by which relative positions and relations of objects in space are perceived.
special senses  those of seeing, hearing, taste, smell, and sometimes sense of equilibrium.
stereognostic sense  the sense by which form and solidity are perceived.
temperature sense  the sense by which differences of temperature are distinguished by the thermoreceptors.
vestibular sense  s. of equilibrium.
vibration sense  pallesthesia.
visceral sense  the awareness of sensations that arise from the viscera and stimulate the interoceptors; sensations include pain, pressure or fullness, and organ movement.

sense

(sĕns)
n.
a. Any of the faculties by which stimuli from outside or inside the body are received and felt, as the faculties of hearing, sight, smell, touch, taste, and equilibrium.
b. A perception or feeling produced by a stimulus; sensation: a sense of fatigue and hunger.
tr.v. sensed, sensing, senses
1. To become aware of; perceive: organisms able to sense their surroundings.
2. To detect automatically: sense radioactivity.
adj.
Genetics Of or relating to the portion of the strand of double-stranded DNA that serves as a template for and is transcribed into RNA.

sense

Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 n, the faculty by which stimuli are perceived and conditions outside and within the body are distinguished and evaluated. The major senses are sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and pressure. Other senses include hunger; thirst; pain; temperature; proprioception; and spatial, temporal, and visceral sensations.
2 n, the ability to feel; a sensation.
3 n, the capacity to understand; normal mental ability.
4 v, to perceive through a sense organ.
5 adj, pertaining to the sense strand of a nucleic acid. Compare antisense.

Sense

The National Deafblind and Rubella Association. The leading national (UK) charity that supports and campaigns for children and adults who are deafblind, providing expert advice and information as well as specialist services to deafblind people, their families, carers and the professionals who work with them. Sense also supports people with sensory impairments and additional disabilities.

sense

Neurology The ability to perceive a stimulus. See Haptic sense.

sense

(sens)
The faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense

stimulus perception
  • pressure sense discrimination of varying levels of pressure at the body surface

  • special senses sight, smell, sound, taste, touch

sense 

Any faculty (or ability) by which some aspect of the environment is perceived. The five main senses are those of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. The sense of sight may be further divided into the colour sense, the form sense, the light sense, the space sense, etc.

sense

(sens)
Faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense (sens),

n a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Hunger, thirst, malaise, and pain are varieties of sense.
sense, special,
n one or all of the five senses: feeling, hearing, seeing, smell, and taste.

sense

a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Hunger, thirst, malaise and pain are varieties of sense; a sense of equilibrium or of well-being (euphoria) and other senses are also distinguished. The five major senses comprise vision, hearing, smell (2), taste and touch (1).
The operation of all senses involves the reception of stimuli by sense organs. Each sense organ is sensitive to a particular kind of stimulus. The eyes are sensitive to light; the ears, to sound; the olfactory organs of the nose, to odor; and the taste buds of the tongue, to taste. Various sense organs of the skin and other tissues are sensitive to touch, pain, temperature and other sensations.
On receiving stimuli, the sense organ translates them into nerve impulses that are transmitted along the sensory nerves to the brain. In the cerebral cortex, the impulses are interpreted, or perceived, as sensations. The brain associates them with other information, acts upon them, and stores them as memory. See also sensation.

cutaneous sense
skin senses including touch, pressure, pain, heat and cold.
sense organs
1. the organs of special sense including eye, olfactory organ, gustatory organs.
2. all organs containing sensory receptors.
special s's
the five senses including feeling, hearing, seeing, smelling, tasting.
sense strand

Patient discussion about sense

Q. I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses? what are the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia and can they be aggravated? I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses?

A. Great answeer...couldn't agree more!

Q. I am getting a sense of fear that I am getting addicted to alcohol. hi my friends……I am getting a sense of fear that I am getting addicted to alcohol; I am not sure of it as I drink casually in parties and I feel like having it again alone….I don’t always get the feel of satisfaction. Moreover if there is no party I keep a party and once with the party I drink again alone…it’s just making my head turn to alcohol after party. ..it has negative results in me as I have problem in getting my job done and I have lost huge money….please guide me…..I don’t want to go to doctor as I may lose my job if my office knows about it…

A. Though alcohol can be consumed in a social life, as the proverb says ‘too much of anything is good for nothing’ more than adequate consumption of alcohol will amount to health issue which is a concern for anyone. A will is an instrument to change the direction of the flow you desire. I guess these are thoughts you require now. May be you are towards alcoholism, but a diagnosis test in the form of questionnaire hints on the persons will to accept and leave the alcohol. You have shown will to accept that you may be an alcoholic but leaving is the part of treatment and must be guided. For that please make your will strong to leave or reduce the consumption of alcohol to have a happy life ?

Q. I have a very acute sense of smell. Most things that have a smell cause me to have Migraines every day. I have heard that a chiropractor is who I need to treat me for this problem. Anyone else here have this problem? What have you done and were you able to treat it?

A. I can't remember where I heard about the chiropractor's involvement but it is really unpleasant. I tend to make life unpleasant for others to, just not to have a migraine. Things like cooking popcorn, perfumes, trash and many other things will give me a migraine (not a headache) right away. It may be called Hyperosmia (abnormal sense of smell).

More discussions about sense
References in classic literature ?
She is not a clever girl, but she has better sense than you are aware of, and does not deserve to have her understanding spoken of so slightingly.
said the madman; 'well, we shall see; God be with you; but I swear to you by Jupiter, whose majesty I represent on earth, that for this crime alone, which Seville is committing to-day in releasing you from this house, and treating you as if you were in your senses, I shall have to inflict such a punishment on it as will be remembered for ages and ages, amen.
She did say this as plainly as a frank and flashing glance could, but in a moment the glow of her complexion, the radiance of her aspect, had subsided; if strongly conscious of her talents, she was equally conscious of her harassing defects, and the remembrance of these obliterated for a single second, now reviving with sudden force, at once subdued the too vivid characters in which her sense of her powers had been expressed.
For fashion is not good sense absolute, but relative; not good sense private, but good sense entertaining company.
THAT uses the individual for its own ends, trampling upon him if he thwarts it, rewarding him with medals, pensions, honours, when he serves it faithfully; THIS, strong only in his independence, threads his way through the state, for convenience' sake, paying in money or service for certain benefits, but with no sense of obligation; and, indifferent to the rewards, asks only to be left alone.
Robert himself is certainly worth knowing--a really attractive union of manliness and saintliness, of shrewd sense and unworldly aims, and withal with that kindness and pity the absence of which so often abates the actual value of those other gifts.
Regardless of the fact that Tarzan felt no such fear of the lion as you and I might experience under like circumstances, he yet was imbued with the sense of caution that is necessary to all creatures of the wild if they are to survive.
Stung by my own sense of self-reproach, I turned with a start, and looked toward her chair by the window.
My great and good friend, I hear that you are going to show us your navy, in order to impress us with a sense of your power.
Dampier came forward in gown and slippers to receive me, giving me the greeting that I wished, and if I had held a thought that it might more fitly have been accorded me at the front door the first look at him dispelled any sense of his inhospitality.
of each literary work as a product of Fine Art, appealing with peculiar power both to our minds and to our emotions, not least to the sense of Beauty and the whole higher nature.
I shall not make the attempt, my dear man; but to avoid any misunderstanding occurring between us in future, let me ask, in what sense do you speak of a ruler or stronger whose interest, as you were saying, he being the superior, it is just that the inferior should execute-- is he a ruler in the popular or in the strict sense of the term?