sensation

(redirected from sensationally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sensation

 [sen-sa´shun]
an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation zonesthesia.
gnostic s's sensations perceived by the more recently developed senses, such as those of light touch and the epicritic sensibility to muscle, joint, and tendon vibrations.
primary sensation that resulting immediately and directly from application of a stimulus.
referred sensation (reflex sensation) one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation one originating with the organism and not occurring in response to an external stimulus.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn),
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

/sen·sa·tion/ (sen-sa´shun) an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation  zonesthesia.
referred sensation , reflex sensation one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation  one perceptible only to the subject, and not connected with any object external to the body.

sensation

(sĕn-sā′shən)
n.
a. A perception associated with stimulation of a sense organ or with a specific body condition: the sensation of heat; a visual sensation.
b. The faculty to feel or perceive; physical sensibility: The patient has very little sensation left in the right leg.
c. An indefinite generalized body feeling: a sensation of lightness.

sensation

[sensā′shən]
Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 a feeling, impression, or awareness of a body state or condition that results from the stimulation of a sensory receptor site and transmission of the nerve impulse along an afferent fiber to the brain. Kinds of sensation include delayed sensation, epigastric sensation, primary sensation, referred sensation, and subjective sensation.
2 a feeling or an awareness of a mental or emotional state, which may or may not result in response to an external stimulus.
enlarge picture
Pathways of sensation

sensation

Homeopathy
A general term for the quality of a symptom; for example, a pain can be burning, throbbing, tearing and so on.

Mainstream medicine
The conscious recognition of a physical (audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual) stimulation that excites a sense organ.

Psychology
The mental and emotional experience associated with a sound, light or other simple stimulus, and the initial information-processing steps by which sense organs and neural pathways receive stimulus information from the environment.

sensation

Mainstream medicine The conscious recognition of a physical–audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual stimulation which excites a sense organ. See Epicritic sensation.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

The conscious experience produced by the stimulation of any sense organ such as the eye, ear, nose, tongue, skin, or any internal sensory receptor.

sensation

central nervous system translation of incoming sensory stimuli into conscious awareness

sensation 

The conscious response to the effect of a stimulus exciting any sense organ. See perception.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; translation into consciousness of effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation (sensā´shən),

n an impression conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium commune.
sensation, psychologic effects of,
n an arousal, facilitation, and distortion of sensation by psychologic factors, the basis for which lies in the corticalization of the special senses.
sensation, referred,
n a group of vaguely classified sensations that are a consequence of cortical experience. They are the sensory hallucinations,
paresthesias, and the phenomenon called
phantom limb. Nonspecific and poorly localized pain in the alveolar ridges, which have poor vascular supply, may be evidence of this phantom limb phenomenon associated with neurotic behavior.
sensation, specialized,
n a sensation that is perceived by the specialized end organs associated with special senses such as vision, hearing, and smell.

sensation

an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium. Includes cold, distention, hunger, itch, pain, taste of various kinds, thermal, thirst, tickle, touch, warmth and some psychological and emotional experiences which animals obviously experience but cannot describe. See also sense.

sensation disturbance
cutaneous sensation errors include paresthesia, hyperesthesia, anesthesia. See also blindness, deafness.

Patient discussion about sensation

Q. What causes a warm sensation in your foot I have a warm sensation at sole of left foot lasting 5-10 second From time to time I get a warm sensation at the sole of my foot lasting about 5-10 seconds. Started about 2 months ago.

A. Frankly? Although it's tempting to try to give you diagnosis here, these kinds of complaints are so varied and can point to so many different directions I would refrain from doing it. In my opinion you should see a doctor. It's impossible to give a diagnosis based on one line. Sorry...

More discussions about sensation
References in periodicals archive ?
But the game turned sensationally as Spurs hit back with three goals in five minutes.
ROY HODGSON was sensationally sacked last night within an hour of Blackburn hitting rock bottom in the Premiership.
Mythologizing the 1992 Clinton campaign already "documented" by the spin-doctor cinema verite of The War Room, the novel was sensationally vivid - at least in its representation of candidate Governor Jack Stanton, and his wife Susan, as he vied for the Democratic nomination.
The sensationally titled article, "IT Doesn't Matter," declared that information technology has matured to the point where it no longer gives companies competitive advantages.
Last Saturday in Paris Haye sensationally won the WBA and WBC cruiserweight titles and immediately decided to move to heavyweight.
Gallant Dreams Race 7 Churchill Dns Been away for a bit, like others in here, but has trained sensationally here since leaving Keeneland
AFC TELFORD will have to contemplate the Unibond Premier play-offs this week after they were sensationally beaten 2-1 by Burscough at a highly-charged New Bucks Head.
Dermot O'Leary has sensationally been appointed as the show's new presenter, replacing Kate Thornton.
The 32-year-old Cardiff- born actor has been shooting the campaign just a month after the fashion house sensationally dropped Kate Moss for allegedly using illegal drugs.
A couple of hours after finishing fourth in her first professional tournament, 16-year-old Michelle Wie was sensationally disqualified from the Samsung World Championship at Bighorn in Palm Desert, California.
The 21-year-old Olympic, Commonwealth and world champion was yesterday sensationally disqualified from the 400m freestyle at the Australian selection trials in Sydney after overbalancing into the water before the gun sounded to start his qualifying heat.
Remounting its acclaimed 1993 production - with David Hockney's sensationally sensuous sets - for the first time, the company is staking a claim at being the most risk-taking opera house in America, at least through mid-March, when this production and Robert Wilson's stunning reconception of ``Madama Butterfly'' close.