senesce


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senesce

(sə-nĕs′)
intr.v. se·nesced, se·nescing, se·nesces
1. To grow old; age.
2. To stop dividing, as certain cells.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It was found that cells senesce in young age in atherosclerosis and was found in Werner and Progeria syndromes.
In the bean cultivar, the leaves senesce too early, resulting in a reduced source size with photosynthates primarily allocated to the fruit at the expense of the roots.
Majority of the people were not in senesce when they were brought out of the container bearing number LSA-045.
Otherwise through the passages of deep time individuals who did not senesce would outcompete those who did, and the high fitness costs of getting old would have been selected against.
The sgr gene helps break down chlorophyll when leaves and cotyledons senesce.
They speculated that most of the ITC release from canola root systems occurs when the large taproots, which contain most of the GSLs, senesce at crop maturity and that the ITCs released from fine roots prior to maturity are insufficient to significantly reduce inoculum levels.
Infected soybean plants will senesce prematurely; foliage will appear chlorotic and pods fail to fill completely (Bowers and Russin, 1999).
However, the slow growth and small sizes attained by the oyster drills at Caminada Pass (average oyster drill size was only 35 mm) may mean they do not reproduce until their second spring, and senesce shortly afterwards.
It has been left on the ground for six weeks for the leaf to senesce and fall off the stem so that retting can take place.
As this starts to happen, the lower leaves will begin to yellow and eventually senesce.
Cool-season annual species m aximize aboveground growth at the expense of resource use efficiency (Jackson and Roy 1986) and senesce by late spring/early summer.