semiotics

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Related to semiotician: semiology, semiological, semiologist

semiotics

 [se″me-ot´iks]
1. the study of signs and symbols.

se·mi·ot·ics

, semeiotics (sē'mē-ot'iks, sem-e-),
1. The general philosophic theory of signs and symbols in communication, having three branches: syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.
2. Obsolete term for symptomatology.
[see semiotic]

semiotics

/se·mi·ot·ics/ (-iks) symptomatology.

semiotics

The study of signs, including words, symbols, gestures and body language, and of their cardinal role in conveying information. Semiotic studies suggest that meaning, although it may often seem self-evident, is always the result of social conventions. Cultures can be analyzed in terms of a series of sign systems. One difficulty, perhaps responsible for a certain vagueness in discussion of the subject, is that the experts have never been able to reach full agreement on the exact definition of the central terms ‘sign’, ‘symbol’ and ‘signal’.

semiotics

the study of communication between organisms.

semiotics,

References in periodicals archive ?
In this respect, Rolland Barthes (1957), as referred to by Danesi (1995:24) draws attention of semioticians to an appreciation of advertisement as text and field of study in which are significations of meaning making.
You say that a semiotician working in this area has to stay up to date with developments in biology.
Johnson-Laird, Language and Perception (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1976); and for studies in the field of semiotics--which views culture as a spatial metalanguage--see, for instance, the work of the Tartu School, especially the Russian cultural semiotician Yuri Lotman, The Structure of the Artistic Text, translated by Gall Lenhoff and Ronald Vroon (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 1977).
This approach to the text warrants a methodology defined as narrative semiology, as developed mostly by the semiotician Algirdas Greimas.
The semiotician courts banality," Culler has written, "because he is committed to studying meanings already known or attested within a culture in the hope of formulating the conventions that members of that culture are following" (99).
So argues semiotician Marcel Danesi in Forever Young, an unforgiving look at modern culture's incessant drive to create a 'teen-aging' of adult life.
But Miss Givhan, as befits a fashion correspondent, is not really a semiotician, except in the sense that we are all semioticians nowadays.
He has maintained his interest in symbolist and Parnassian poetry throughout his career, with the semiotician making way for the scholar concerned with the text itself.
Julia Kristeva, a French semiotician who was influenced by the work of Bakhtin, coined the term intertextuality in 1966 (Cuddon, 1999, p.
According to Paul Bouissac, semiotician of the circus quoted by Russo, the air is a space of negotiation for the aerialiste, less of an angel in the house than a working girl in the air, which highlights her normally concealed corporeality amidst simulated spectacle and in the air, defying gravity, negotiates space from which alternative representative spaces for heterogeneous, somersaulting identities may be articulated.