semiotic


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semiotic

 [se″me-ot´ik]
1. pertaining to signs and symbols.
2. pertaining to the signs and symptoms of a disease.
3. pathognomonic. Also spelled semeiotic.

se·mi·ot·ic

, semeiotic (sē'mē-ot'ik, sem-ē-),
1. Relating to semiotics.
2. Relating to signs, linguistic or bodily.
[G. sēmeiōtikos, fr. sēmeion, sign]

semiotic

/se·mi·ot·ic/ (se″me-ot´ik)
1. pertaining to signs or symptoms.

semiotic

(sē′mē-ŏt′ĭk, sĕm′ē-, sē′mī-) also

semiotical

(-ĭ-kəl) or

semeiotic

(sē′mē-, sĕm′ē-, sē′mī-) also

semeiotical

(-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Relating to symptomatology.

se′mi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

se·mi·ot·ic

, semeiotic (sĕ'mē-ot'ik)
Relating to signs, either linguistic or physical.
[G. sēmeiōtikos, fr. sēmeion, sign]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The significance of this semiosphere lies in the concept of opposition: a semiotic sphere vs.
a general practitioner of medicine and trained in the sciences, draws on the fields of hard science and medicine to demonstrate his semiotic view of reality.
The book is well argued but presumes a certain familiarity with semiotic theory.
Though Mavers (2007, 2009) has explored the concept of a semiotic ensemble in young students' composition of written and drawn texts, and Kress (2010) has developed this concept to describe a variety of other semiotic processes, its potential has not been developed for understanding emergent multimodal reading processes.
White's reflections on writing and the writing process suggest that the abject, semiotic dimension of signification was of vital importance to him.
Viewed through this social semiotic frame, the transformativeness inquiry occurs in the context of audience interaction with and about the work, rather than in "the meanings and effects that [its] authors hope for.
Such philosophers, refusing to recognize the postmodern semiotic revolution, are "sleepwalkers, as it were, now in an intellectual culture which can no longer avoid the Way of Signs, but ensorcelled in a circle of 'epistemology' and 'critical philosophy' determined not to see beyond itself, veritable zombies of philosophy.
These articles cover a wide range of arguments, but for the most part they are founded on the semiotic approach to analysis, while also continuing the examination of the acceptability or appropriateness of term adaptation.
Braf (2001) suggests the purpose of the semiotic ladder is to provide a framework for understanding the many different usages of information from technical to human considerations.
Music as Discourse picks up where his earlier book, Playing With Signs: A Semiotic Interpretation of Classic Music (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991) left off.
The underlying idea is that perceiving math as a semiotic discipline allows learners to acquire its basic structure effortless, as in other semiotic disciplines like language and music.
The synergies in such an approach should be seen to draw from semiotic, pragmatic and functional dimensions of language use on one hand, and inter-medial and interdisciplinary convergence and cross-fertilization on the other, hence multidimensional perspectives to narrative appreciation.