semeiotic


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se·mi·ot·ic

, semeiotic (sē'mē-ot'ik, sem-ē-),
1. Relating to semiotics.
2. Relating to signs, linguistic or bodily.
[G. sēmeiōtikos, fr. sēmeion, sign]

se·mi·ot·ic

, semeiotic (sĕ'mē-ot'ik)
Relating to signs, either linguistic or physical.
[G. sēmeiōtikos, fr. sēmeion, sign]

semeiotic

1. pertaining to clinical signs.
2. pathognomonic.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To understand Peirce's fundamental semeiotic concept of triadicity required a radical reorientation in Percy's thought.
But in fact, the semeiotic question was for Percy at the heart of all those matters.
He closely follows Peirce's writings to strike a balance between the more positivistic reading that attributes Peirce's discussions of these issues to character faults and the overly romantic reading that takes up the affective dimensions and downplays Peirce's technical developments in logic, semeiotic, and scientific practice.
Fisch has given an account of Peirce's appropriation of Bain's psychological constructions in his "Alexander Bain and the Genealogy of Pragmatism," in Peirce, Semeiotic, and Pragmatism, 79-109.
Peter Skagestad's "Peirce's Semeiotic Model of the Mind" includes a pleasing discussion of the following passage from Peirce: "A psychologist cuts out a lobe of my brain (nihil animale a me alienum puto) and then, when I find I cannot express myself, he says, 'You see, your faculty of language was localized in that lobe.
These new paradigms are employed in the development of Peirce's semeiotic, which is the subject of the second paper in the first section.
Of particular interest is Deledalle's discussion of "Semeiotic and Communication," which brings Peirce together with Marshall McLuhan in a discussion of the prospects for a semeiotic theory of media.
Chapters 5, 6, and 7 accomplish this by applying the sharpened idea of continuity and immediate connection to the realms of Phenomenology, the Normative Sciences, and Logic Conceived as Semeiotic, respectively.
Felicia Kruse analyzes the triadic character of interpretation in Peirce's semeiotic or doctrine of signs.
Fisch, "Philodemus and Semeiosis (1879-1883)," section 5 of the essay "Peirce's General Theory of Signs," in Peirce, Semeiotic, and Pragmatism.