semantics

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semantics

 [sĕ-man´tiks]
study of the meanings of words and the rules of their use; study of the relation between language and significance.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks), A branch of semiotics:
1. The study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents; the relations between the signs of a system; and human behavioral reaction to signs, including unconscious attitudes, influences of social institutions, and epistemologic and linguistic assumptions.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

[siman′tiks]
Etymology: Gk, semantikos, significant
the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words or other symbols.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks)
1. Study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

The study of meaning, of the effectiveness with which thought is translated into language, and of the relationship between words and symbols and meaning.

semantics (siman´tiks),

n the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words and other symbols.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, according to semanticist explanations we should reduce the meaning of the sentence uttered to, and just to, its literal content.
Strawson's principal ground for giving the palm to the communication theorist is an argument purporting to show that the dictum which the semanticist supposes to be elucidatory of notions of meaning is inevitably less basic than the eventual output of a satisfactory theory of communication-intention.
To general semanticists, the abstract nature of a term like listening comes as no surprise.
Now by doing a little of what the general semanticists call indexing, we can see that what we call a failing student is simply a student who does not function well in a particular learning environment.
Preoccupied with the correction of 'ideas,' he is extremely attentive to words, propositions, and their internal order and coherence ('logic'); he is likely to regard as irrelevant, therefore, all the nonlinguistic setting and consequences which, according to the semanticist, give to linguistic events whatever significance they may possess.
The verb "to be" and its various uses of "is" can cause neurolinguistic difficulties resulting in the confounding of semantic reactions General semanticists need not desire to undo the poetry of English as in the line from Shakespeare, "To be or not to be, that is the question.
In addition to being of interest to media ecologists and general semanticists, this stimulating and provocative book should have great appeal for scholars and students in the areas of semiotics, rhetorical theory, orality/ literacy studies, philosophy of communication, and communication theory.
I wish to suggest two areas in which the analysis of irony in Erickson/Espinosa's speech to the Tea Party can be of value to General Semanticists.
But even general semanticists could probably envision themselves referring to that world as "empty of any conceptual designations we can make about it.
Whatever you say it is, it isn't," say general semanticists, meaning that whatever one can say about something isn't it.
Because of our time-binding capabilities, general semanticists often ask how, exactly, do these "generalized meanings" get constructed as performances of writing (and orality for that matter)?
General semanticists by and large are well acquainted with the story of how a young engineer from Poland named Alfred Korzybski was horrified by his experiences during the First World War, the first war to use weapons of mass destruction, the war that put an end to the notion that war is glamorous, glorious, an occasion for celebration rather than a tragedy.

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