semantics

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semantics

 [sĕ-man´tiks]
study of the meanings of words and the rules of their use; study of the relation between language and significance.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks), A branch of semiotics:
1. The study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents; the relations between the signs of a system; and human behavioral reaction to signs, including unconscious attitudes, influences of social institutions, and epistemologic and linguistic assumptions.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

[siman′tiks]
Etymology: Gk, semantikos, significant
the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words or other symbols.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks)
1. Study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

The study of meaning, of the effectiveness with which thought is translated into language, and of the relationship between words and symbols and meaning.

semantics (siman´tiks),

n the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words and other symbols.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most people do not consider the Buddha and Nagarjuna as philosophers of language, general semanticists, or linguists, and I do not wish to say that they "are general semanticists, or that we should see the Madyamaka and General Semantics as the often discussed "different paths up the same mountain.
In closing, let me reiterate that I do not see Nagarjuna as a general semanticist or general semanticists as "Buddhists without portfolio.
General semanticist Robert Wilson supports a similar perspective when he asserts (1989, p.
As general semanticist Wendell Johnson states, "[language] plays a role in determining the structure of our culture, our society, our civilization.
Possible world semanticists talk and reason as though possible worlds were somehow given, were part of what is available and in hand to work with.
Specifically, general semanticists have proposed that we can better understand high-order abstractions and help ourselves retreat from the "is" of identity through the application of "a few simple devices called extensional devices, [with which] the structure of language could be modified in such a way as to take into account process, duration of time, uniqueness, specificity, generality, environmental factors, holistic principles, etc.
Indeed, from a general semanticist perspective, the problem lies in something much deeper.
Now by doing a little of what the general semanticists call indexing, we can see that what we call a failing student is simply a student who does not function well in a particular learning environment.
The point is that language is magic, as the semanticists have acknowledged all along.
Preoccupied with the correction of 'ideas,' he is extremely attentive to words, propositions, and their internal order and coherence ('logic'); he is likely to regard as irrelevant, therefore, all the nonlinguistic setting and consequences which, according to the semanticist, give to linguistic events whatever significance they may possess.

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