semantics

(redirected from semanticist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to semanticist: semantic

semantics

 [sĕ-man´tiks]
study of the meanings of words and the rules of their use; study of the relation between language and significance.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks), A branch of semiotics:
1. The study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents; the relations between the signs of a system; and human behavioral reaction to signs, including unconscious attitudes, influences of social institutions, and epistemologic and linguistic assumptions.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

[siman′tiks]
Etymology: Gk, semantikos, significant
the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words or other symbols.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks)
1. Study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

The study of meaning, of the effectiveness with which thought is translated into language, and of the relationship between words and symbols and meaning.

semantics (siman´tiks),

n the study of language with special concern for the meanings of words and other symbols.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generative semanticists proposed the rule of "beheading" for English to account for phenomena such as those in examples like 2 and 3:
What makes this idiosyncratic is, above all, the failure to place the phenomena in question in the context of other sources of utterance meaning, which have attracted more attention among semanticists in recent decades, such as indexicality, implicature, presupposition, and speech acts.
The grammar should hold wide appeal, not just for linguists of various stripes (typologists, syntacticlans, morphologists, semanticists, phonologists), but also for anthropologists.
Sadly, in the firearms owners civil rights wars, the best semanticists are on the other side.
Linguistically, the underlying classification would of course be strongly questioned nowadays by those semanticists who see hierarchical relations as only one (arguably rather atypical) kind of lexical structure.
People who call themselves general semanticists should take time-binding seriously and do the best they can to improve humankind's store of knowledge so the next generation will have enhanced data to work with.
In this paper the author outlines an argument against this claim and argues that by holding on to uniqueness, contemporary semanticists make a momentous mistake: they keep the illusion alive that there is a way to account for linguistic meaning without addressing what linguistic expressions are for.
For much of what GS is about for those who self-identify as general semanticists is bound up in the work, and in the person, of Count Alfred Korzybski (1921, 1933).
However, the drawback and deficit of this possible worlds approach to counterfactuals that is so popular among contemporary semanticists lies in its inherent intractability.

Full browser ?