selfhood


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selfhood

(sĕlf′ho͝od′)
n.
1. The state of having a distinct identity; individuality.
2. The fully developed self; an achieved personality.
3. Self-centeredness: "the cult of selfhood that became fashionable in the 1960s" (David Rankin).
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a sense in which Blake must find this dire view of selfhood unavoidable.
Part 4 looks to script-commissioning practices and metatheater for more evidence that the selfhood of Shakespearean drama is fragmented through and through and subject to probability.
Taking a closer look at the relation between selfhood and self-esteem it seems that to speak of esteeming oneself in the abovementioned sense presupposes different perspectives on the self.
In addition, the discussion of zombies and selfhood in chapter 27 is more convincing if the reader is familiar with the arguments introduced in Fantastic Metamorphoses--Warner does not repeat her former theses here.
In my view, maternal forms of selfhood are not the preserve of mothers but emerge and flourish when people are engaged in care-giving, regardless of gender.
7) As Weinstein has shown, innocence for Morrison refers not to a virtuous state of isolation from worldly evils, but a male fantasy of pure, unadulterated, intact selfhood and sovereign will, untainted by the intrusion of shame (130-31).
She explores the idea that selfhood is a narrative accomplishment, achieved by people telling stories to themselves and about themselves.
It may feel like an assault, much of selfhood will be lost to us in its wake, but something wonderful will be recovered.
Positive psychologists are investigating virtues, along with psychologists interested in exploring the ethical dimensions of personality traits (like conscientiousness), the whole of a person's moral life (rather than particular moral decisions or behaviors), and rich conceptions of moral selfhood.
In this exhibition three separate bodies of work all addressed issues of identity and selfhood.
Literary Legacies, Folklore Foundations: Selfhood and Cultural Tradition in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature.