selfhood


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selfhood

(sĕlf′ho͝od′)
n.
1. The state of having a distinct identity; individuality.
2. The fully developed self; an achieved personality.
3. Self-centeredness: "the cult of selfhood that became fashionable in the 1960s" (David Rankin).
References in periodicals archive ?
Going in a totally different direction, selfhood is when someone or something is not the same as any other person or thing.
Moreover, in her book Wilhelm Meisters Schwestern (Wilhelm Meister's sisters) published in 2006, Anja May notes that to date the significance of gender for the definition of the genre has not been thoroughly studied (14-21) and that novels focusing on the female hero are still excluded from the category Bildungsroman, while the category itself continues to be an important paradigm for conceptualizing selfhood.
Quinney implicitly sets this self apart from historically-specific modes of conceptualizing selfhood and from the changing historical conditions in which selfhood is experienced.
The latter two chapters of Part 3 elaborate on this fragmented selfhood by showing how the play's "preposterous conclusions" involve both the audience through the device of enargeia (vivid description) and Shakespeare's composition process, which exercises its own kind of ingenuity (183).
Neither simply a theoretical study of selfhood nor a philological account of modernist writing practices, Fordham's book "aims to combine biographical and genetic methods, but to offer something distinct from both" (26).
In addition, the discussion of zombies and selfhood in chapter 27 is more convincing if the reader is familiar with the arguments introduced in Fantastic Metamorphoses--Warner does not repeat her former theses here.
The perception of losing autonomous forms of selfhood is also a powerful disincentive for new fathers.
Nor, as Wahrman is certainly aware, was the Modern Regime of Selfhood immune to destabilization, as suggested by the similarity of Wahrman's opposition of the other-directed Ancien Regime of Identity and the inner-directed Modern Self to the dynamic David Reisman posited for postwar American culture, only in reverse.
Central to this interest in split or multiple selfhood and identity is a revisitation of Atwood's preoccupation with the role of language and narrative in the fashioning and preservation of identity.
Feminists who honored female experiences while defying the ban on empathic connection between knower and known showed that selfhood did not exist except "in relation.
What makes his survey intriguing is his focus on changing American society and culture which fostered the idea of selfhood as a status, and later on as a willful construction.
It's quite possible to maintain one's human dignity and selfhood while imprisoned; not so with torture, which, as Sullivan put in The New Republic, "takes what is animal in us and deploys it against what makes us human.