self-worth


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self-worth

(sĕlf′wûrth′)
n.
Self-esteem; self-respect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Communication: talk to them about what they see online and reassure them of their self-worth and importance
Comparisons kill confidence because they put our self-worth on a measuring stick.
Although it's stereotypical and might have been predicted," Stefanone concludes, "it's disappointing to me that, in the year 2011, so many young women continue to assert their self-worth via their physical appearance--in this case, by posting photos of themselves on Facebook as a form of advertisement.
That is, findings from the two-dimensional approach can suggest whether interventions should target the enhancement of self-worth or the reduction of self-deprecation (Owens, 1994).
What served to save me and allowed me to grow and recognize my self-worth was joining the board of directors of the Kin On Chinese Nursing Home Society and the Asian Counseling and Referral Service.
Such sessions include teaching young people about God's plan for sexuality, raising teenager's self-worth by letting them know of God's love for them, understanding who God really is, and more.
Participants, on average, presented relatively higher positive affect and self-worth than negative affect and self-deprecation, respectively.
The results from the Northumbria University study also revealed that the effect was considerably more noticeable in boys with them reporting much greater changes in physical self-worth compared to girls.
cynicism--manages to produce one of American art's most illuminating impressions of the early twenty-first century: an anxious, murky, slightly paranoid tragicomedy of drastic measures, or a quest for secular enlightenment, self-worth, and a better tomorrow.
City Yoga makes it a point not to judge students who can't strike a perfect pose, and even the most basic beginners are welcome, especially gay men and lesbians, who "have issues with self-worth and seff-loathing," Holzman says.
When a subject recalls a painful event from the past, feelings of rejection, anger, shame, and low self-worth arise.