self-tolerance


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self-tolerance

 [self-tol´er-ans]
immunological tolerance to self-antigens.

hor·ror au·to·tox·'i·cus

a term introduced by Ehrlich, meaning that immunity is directed against foreign materials but not against the constituents of one's own body; exceptions to this concept are the autoallergic reactions and diseases.
Synonym(s): self-tolerance
[L., dread of self-poisoning]

self-tolerance

/self-tol·er·ance/ (-tol´er-ans) immunological tolerance to self-antigens.

self-tolerance

(sĕlf′tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
Tolerance by the body's immune system to its own cells and tissues.

self-tolerance

the absence of an immune response directed against a person's own tissue antigens.

self-tolerance

immunological tolerance to the body's own ANTIGENS (self antigens), achieved by preventing the production of functional B-CELLS and T-CELLS reactive to such antigens. Thus the body is not able to direct an IMMUNE RESPONSE against self antigens. Breakdown of this mechanism leads to AUTOIMMUNITY and production of autoantibodies against self antigens.

self-tolerance

immunological tolerance to self-antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
In abnormally functioning immune systems, however, the self-tolerance process can go awry resulting in the body attacking its own tissues or organs.
In the publication, entitled "How self-tolerance and the immunosuppressive drug FK506 prevent B-cell mitogenesis," the authors identify a set of genes that appear to be associated with a normal self-tolerance process.
Richard Glynne, lead author of the study and head of the genomics biology group at Eos, comments, "Comparison of gene expression levels in the self-tolerance model versus FK506 treatment indicates that the effects of FK506 are very different from natural self-tolerance at the molecular level.