self-tolerance


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self-tolerance

 [self-tol´er-ans]
immunological tolerance to self-antigens.

hor·ror au·to·tox·'i·cus

a term introduced by Ehrlich, meaning that immunity is directed against foreign materials but not against the constituents of one's own body; exceptions to this concept are the autoallergic reactions and diseases.
Synonym(s): self-tolerance
[L., dread of self-poisoning]

self-tolerance

/self-tol·er·ance/ (-tol´er-ans) immunological tolerance to self-antigens.

self-tolerance

(sĕlf′tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
Tolerance by the body's immune system to its own cells and tissues.

self-tolerance

the absence of an immune response directed against a person's own tissue antigens.

self-tolerance

immunological tolerance to the body's own ANTIGENS (self antigens), achieved by preventing the production of functional B-CELLS and T-CELLS reactive to such antigens. Thus the body is not able to direct an IMMUNE RESPONSE against self antigens. Breakdown of this mechanism leads to AUTOIMMUNITY and production of autoantibodies against self antigens.

self-tolerance

immunological tolerance to self-antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
47,48) IFN appears to activate various immune cell types and contributes to the breakdown of B cell self-tolerance.
Homeostasis and self-tolerance in the immune system: turning lymphocytes off.
Because cancer cells are usually normal, healthy cells, which have malfunctioned in some way, self-tolerance can limit the ability of T-cells to react against, and kill, tumours.
The presence of nTregs inhibits EAT induction in genetically-resistant mice [22], and therefore there is a possibility of nTregs mediating self-tolerance in genetically-susceptible mice inhibiting spontaneous autoimmunity.
Self-tolerance checkpoints in B lymphocyte development.
of Oxford, UK), advances in the understanding of immunological tolerance raise the prospect of reestablishing a state of self-tolerance in the face of progressive autoimmunity and also suggest the possibility for avoiding the need for immunosuppression in order to treat transplant rejection.