self-theory

self-theory

a personality theory that uses one's self-concept in integrating the function and organization of the personality. See also humanistic psychology.
References in periodicals archive ?
They explore knowledge and appraisal, dialogical self-theory, transference as a meaning-making mechanism, perceived isolation, need and ability in the process of knowledge formation, social anxiety and performance, human smiles and processing similarities to cultural differences, and finding patterns in the stream of consciousness.
Secondly, no single feminist self-theory can possibly capture the "truth" about all women, as every truth is incomplete, partial, and culture bound (Qin, 2004, 2009; Qin & Lykes, 2006).
In the case of careers, people may become more adaptable if they focus on their short-term rather than long- term decisions, if they aim for the good options rather than the maximum ones, if they focus on the idea of a career that includes the mastery of different roles rather than fixed roles that lead to a final destination, and most important if they apply a self-theory of malleability (my personal qualities can be changed) rather than fixedness (Dweck & Molden, 2005).
Instead, research over the last 20 years supports the fact that performance and motivational differences between individuals with the same innate or learned ability differ based on their implicit self-theory, perceptions of competence, and adopted achievement goal orientation (Dweck & Molden, 2005).