self-theory

self-theory

a personality theory that uses one's self-concept in integrating the function and organization of the personality. See also humanistic psychology.
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Epstein's (1990) cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST) is designed to account for both the analytic and intuitive aspects of information processing.
They explore knowledge and appraisal, dialogical self-theory, transference as a meaning-making mechanism, perceived isolation, need and ability in the process of knowledge formation, social anxiety and performance, human smiles and processing similarities to cultural differences, and finding patterns in the stream of consciousness.
Secondly, no single feminist self-theory can possibly capture the "truth" about all women, as every truth is incomplete, partial, and culture bound (Qin, 2004, 2009; Qin & Lykes, 2006).
They were Self-Esteem, Self Actualization, Physical Thriving, and Security based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory; Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness based on Self-Determination Theory; Pleasure / Stimulation based on behaviorist general principles of reward and punishment and Epstein's cognitive-experiential self-theory (1990) which specifies pleasure as one of the four needs that all individuals must satisfy and Money and Popularity based on the evolutionary or adaptationist perspective that assumes an evolutionary advantage to individuals who achieve material dominance (Buss, 1997).
Problem: The self-theory is an important construct related to mental health and adaptive functioning and is distinct from self-esteem or self-efficacy.
James's (1890/1950) self-theory is holistic in its emphasis on psychic unity as a prerequisite for mental health (Hall & Lindzey, 1970).
Dynamic understanding of feelings is a proper basis for further interpretation of transformative features of love in terms of self-theory.
Dweck and Master say that the way students learn is influenced by their self-theory of intelligence.
In the case of careers, people may become more adaptable if they focus on their short-term rather than long- term decisions, if they aim for the good options rather than the maximum ones, if they focus on the idea of a career that includes the mastery of different roles rather than fixed roles that lead to a final destination, and most important if they apply a self-theory of malleability (my personal qualities can be changed) rather than fixedness (Dweck & Molden, 2005).
This self-theory determines the types of strategies one uses to interpret self-relevant information in day-to-day life, as well as approaches to problem solving and decision making.
Instead, research over the last 20 years supports the fact that performance and motivational differences between individuals with the same innate or learned ability differ based on their implicit self-theory, perceptions of competence, and adopted achievement goal orientation (Dweck & Molden, 2005).
Epstein has developed a global theory of personality--cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST)--that posits that analysis and intuition are more likely to be separate modes of information processing served by different cognitive systems rather than being stylistic differences distributed along a bipolar continuum.