self-system

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self-system

the organization of experiences that acts as a protective mechanism against anxiety.
References in periodicals archive ?
The self-system of an individual is composed of the primary ego symbol (I, me) and of the ego systems (we) included with the primary ego to constitute an identity, he says, and it seems that environments provide experience that both separate and unify the self-systems of all who are exposed to them.
The book focuses on how cognitive models can improve anthropological analysis in the context of culture through the interaction of self-systems and social systems.
All well-designed educational programs introduce students to essential knowledge, skills, and learning strategies (the first three domains), but unless they enlist the active support of the students' self-systems, these components may never be seriously employed.
As Marzano points out, instructional programs that address the self-system are rare and tend to be controversial, dealing inevitably with areas of belief, value, and purpose.
The first priority of identity-sensitive education is the self -- ensuring that the student self-system commits its energies wholeheartedly to the educational project through an academic identity and that it is immersed in a social and psychological environment that bolsters that commitment.
His preexisting social identity was constantly fighting, and mostly winning, the self-system battles for control.
The self-systems of insecurely attached individuals, on the other hand, tend to be relatively closed to new information.
The feedforward message that perpetuates the self-system is "Always be prepared for the unpredictable demands of life" (Sperry & Mosak, 1996).
Feedforward processes that perpetuate the histrionic self-system usually take the form of beliefs like "I need others to notice me.
As this view collides with a fragile view of self, defense mechanisms that protect the fragile self-system are strengthened and their narcissistic behavior becomes more apparent to others.
Streeck-Fischer's discussion of xenophobia and violence by adolescent skinheads in Germany shows how membership in violent groups serves to support adolescents' self-systems, even as it intensifies existing personality malformations.
Individuals are complex self-systems who develop autonomous independence capable of pluralistic organization.