self-splicing

self-splicing

(self splīs'ing),
Term describing an intron able to excise itself precisely from the RNA precursor without the involvement of any proteins. The capacity to carry out this reaction is thus specified by the intron RNA itself.
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During my phD, I identified RNA ligands for the magnesium ions that catalyze these splicing reactions and showed that the spliceosomal U6 and U2 small nuclear RNAs form a structure resembling group II self-splicing intron RNAs.
Playing both the infamously savage Cockney crime lords in a dazzling feat of thespian self-splicing to rival Jeremy Irons in "Dead Ringers," Hardy's inspired twin turn elevates and complicates the otherwise straightforward terrain of "Legend," in which U.
The new paper describes the complex interactions of two small RNA molecules and two larger RNA molecules that together influence the function of a self-splicing ribozyme, a structure many biologists had believed had no role other than to reproduce itself.
The presence of transposable, self-splicing group II introns in the genomes of the invading bacterium posed problems for the host organism, since its genome was soon colonized and overrun by transposons whose excision was rather slow.
Spliceosome-excised introns are widely viewed as having evolved from self-splicing group II introns.
Geron Corporation (Menlo Park, CA) and University of Rochester (Rochester, NY) have patented a method of inhibiting the self-splicing of a Group I intron.
BARTEL: The seven known motifs that I was referring to include the self-splicing intron found by Tom Cech, another type of self-splicing intron termed the group II self-splicing intron, which catalyzes splicing with lariat formation.
The European Patent Office did, however, clarify the scope of the claims to cover self-splicing intervening sequence derived ribozymes, which does not significantly narrow the scope of coverage.