sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, these sources contain few of IDCP's Self-Sacrifice dimension typical elements.
The main and interaction effects of the level of leadership (transactional and transformational) and leader self-sacrifice on team identification were calculated separately for each group, using a hierarchical regression model.
Perhaps the ultimate affirmation of the value of self-sacrifice can be found within a variety of faith traditions.
This plus the fact that achieving a goal for the sake of which one has personally sacrificed redeems those self-sacrifices proves that the Sacrifice Principle is true: that the greater the amount of self-sacrifice that goes into achieving a goal, the more its achievement contributes to one's welfare.
Suicide bombing is just an extension of this self-sacrifice - the ultimate extension.
His journey of self-sacrifice is side-tracked by a meeting with performance artist Dua (Margret Vilhjalmsdottir), who has been entrusted with caring for a rare Icelandic falcon rescued by her sick uncle.
But the aftermath of the storm was replete with so many stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that the Pensacola News Journal took nominations for "Heroes during Hurricane Ivan.
Yet, self-sacrifice and deathbed gratitude to aristocratic snobs fitted less comfortably into Verdi's libretto.
She stayed alive with the help of Indian women and Chaska, an Indian man, who several times performed acts of self-sacrifice.
Irwin insists that, owing to his rejection of community as a determining value, Bataille's assertion of self-sacrifice in 1940 differs radically from that advocated by Petain.
Chapter 1 argues that the myth of Pocahontas, which tells the story of Pocahontas' love of a white man, her self-sacrifice, marriage, and conversion, underwrites early and late seventeenth-century dramatic portrayals of colonialism, including plays in which the myth of Pocahontas is only implied.
This event serves as a paradigm of self-sacrifice in her life that becomes clear only as she digs into repressed memories of childhood sexual abuse by a next-door neighbor.