self-respect


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self-respect

(sĕlf′rĭ-spĕkt′)
n.
Due respect for oneself, one's character, and one's conduct.

self′-re·spect′ing adj.
References in classic literature ?
Oh," she thought to herself, with a sudden rush of anguish which threatened disaster to her self-respect, "it has come to this--to this--when I could have given him everything
In this painful position something is due to my own self-respect.
I require time to consider--in justice to my own self-respect," Grace went on.
Nothing matters," the Schlegels had said in the past, "except one's self-respect and that of one's friends.
There is a certain self-respect in the serious man which makes him hold his profoundest feelings sacred.
I sold my conscience, my self-respect, everything in life worth having, to bring a smile to his lips, to help him through a single moment of his misery.
But when I had come so far a way already, mere shame would not suffer me to desist till I had put the matter to the touch of proof; I was bound, out of mere self-respect, to carry it through; and little as I liked the sound of what I heard, and slow as I began to travel, I still kept asking my way and still kept advancing.
While he was maundering on in this way I was, fortunately for my own self-respect, returning to my senses.
I shall never repent the preservation of my self-respect, sir,' said Edward.
He thought of the home he might at that moment have been seeking with pleasure and pride; of the different man he might have been that night; of the lightness then in his now heavy- laden breast; of the then restored honour, self-respect, and tranquillity all torn to pieces.
I had to wrestle with my self-respect when I submitted to be drawn to you in spite of Mr Wrayburn.
All the pride of her nature was stung into activity; the hateful weakness which had dragged her within reach of this wound to her self-respect had at least wrought its own cure.