self-regulation


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self-reg·u·la·tion

(self'reg-yū-lā'shŭn),
A three-stage strategy patients are taught to use to end risky health-associated behaviors such as smoking and overeating: stage 1: self-monitoring (self-observation), the first stage in self-regulation involves the person's deliberately attending to and recording his or her own behavior; stage 2: self-evaluation, the second stage, in which the person assesses what was learned by self-monitoring, such as how often and where smoking occurred, and uses those observational data to establish health goals or criteria; and stage 3: self-reinforcement, the third stage, in which the person rewards herself or himself for each behavioral success on the road to that goal, thereby enhancing the chance of reaching it.

self-regulation

a plan for patients to eliminate health risk behaviors. It includes self-monitoring, self-evaluation, and self-reinforcement.

self-reg·u·la·tion

(self'reg-yū-lā'shŭn)
A three-stage strategy patients are taught to use to end risky health-associated behaviors; stage 1: self-monitoring (self-observation); stage 2: self-evaluation; and stage 3: self-reinforcement.

self-reg·u·la·tion

(self'reg-yū-lā'shŭn)
Three-stage strategy patients are taught to use to end risky health-associated behaviors such as smoking and overeating: stage 1: self-monitoring (self-observation), the first stage in self-regulation involves the person's deliberately attending to and recording his or her own behavior; stage 2: self-evaluation, in which the person assesses what was learned by self-monitoring, such as how often and where smoking occurred, and uses those observational data to establish health goals or criteria; and stage 3: self-reinforcement, in which the person rewards herself or himself for each behavioral success on the road to that goal, thereby enhancing the chance of reaching it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once a person has a particular efficacy for a task, Bandura suggests that self-regulation is closely linked to these beliefs and has the power to directly influence the way in which a person engages in a task.
Researchers have examined self-regulation processes in students with disabilities (Hughes et al.
There is, however, an opposite pattern for traditional-delivery students with low self-regulation and online students with high self-regulation.
Cleary and Zimmerman (2004) suggested that individuals with high self-regulation are able to control their environment and stay motivated to obtain a positive outcome.
In this regard, the most important self-related factors include self-regulation,6 self-esteem,1,7,8 and self-efficacy.
Drawing on the background established so far and the concept of self-regulation [10], Christmann and Taylor [11], Havinga [12], Hutter [13], Umeokafor and Isaac [9] conclude that H&S regulation in the Nigerian construction industry is self-regulated in various forms and not unregulated.
While the degree and form of self-regulation adopted is an area for further discussion, we would argue that nursing and midwifery professionals in Oman are sufficiently mature to exercise their duty for public protection, and have the special knowledge required to set professional standards and assess the conduct of its members.
Fortunately, there is evidence that the circumstances that surround religious faith and participation already involve tasks that increase one's ability for self-regulation.
The phenomenon of self-regulation unfolds between society and the state, between the private and public sectors.
Deficient self-regulation refers to "a state in which conscious self-control is relatively diminished" (LaRose, Lin, & Eastin, 2003, p.
Children who struggle with self-regulation are of particular concern to parents and teachers alike, and with good reason.