self-control

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self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
It opened doors to new and deep appreciations of the marvels and divine design of the human body, opportunities for real sacrifice (to choose spouse over self), repeated calls to self-mastery, examination of one's conscience, regular invitations to examine and discern God's present call to our marriage, and a forced need to stay in close communication and prayer with God and one another.
As Bandura (1977) argues, the sense of perceived self-mastery resulting from one's self-assessment leads to learners' self-efficacy.
Pearlin and Schooler's (1978) Self-Mastery scale (SMS) was administered to assess the degree to which participants perceive that they have control over life events.
Following Schaefer and Moos's (1992) model, we examined several contributing factors: personal characteristics (operationalized as physical health, education, self-esteem, self-mastery, and attachment style of the maternal grandmother) and environmental characteristics (represented by mother--daughter intimacy and grandmother's involvement with her grandchild).
The multiple-choice questions, with answers, can be used for self-assessment before taking a written examination, or to assess self-mastery after an examination.
Here, the authors discuss how psychodynamic social workers routinely advocate for resources within communities while using (in the name of "recovery") such psychodynamic concepts such as self-mastery, self-control, and empowerment.
Not only does she seize opportunities for self-mastery, but also empowers her staff to do the same," Madsen said, adding, "The level of support and encouragement she provides maximizes performance and morale.
The freed African's twin goals of achieving spiritual independence through self-mastery and worldly autonomy through property ownership substitute honorable Christian commerce for the barbarism of the slave trade.
Researchers have implied that the statistical relationships associating optimism with mental and physical well-being become nonsignificant when variables such as neuroticism (Boland & Cappeliez, 1997; Smith, Pope, Rhodewalt, & Poulton, 1989), self-esteem (Fontaine & Jones, 1997), and self-mastery (Marshall & Lang, 1990) are controlled.
Positive social interactions, upbeat music and the sense of self-mastery in meeting a challenge are other possible explanations.
One of the ultimate functions of spirituality is to assist the individual to achieve self-control and self-mastery skills, important in the prevention of early sexual behavior.