self-image

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Related to self-images: Negative self image

self-image

(sĕlf′ĭm′ĭj)
n.
The conception that one has of oneself, including an assessment of qualities and personal worth.

self-image

the total concept, idea, or mental image one has of oneself and of one's role in society; the person one believes oneself to be.

self-image

A person's conception of his or her own appearance, personality and capabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
One size does not fit all, so we've designed this weight loss program for women to help uncover unhealthy self-images and replace them with new healthy options, allowing a return to balance with results that fit each person.
Participants will learn how to untangle the complicated relationship between food, emotions, self-image, and behavior.
A right brain network of these mirror neurons maintains an internal self-image for comparison with faces that one sees, Uddin and her colleagues propose.
The things survivors of childhood cancer worry about may shape their self-images and life outlooks, and subsequently may affect their ability to successfully accomplish developmental tasks such as dating, leaving school, entering the job market, leaving home, marrying and beginning a family, and ultimately achieving economically and socially productive lives.
If interest cannot be sustained, self-image cannot be furthered, and change becomes encumbered.
Because active listening poses no threat to an individual's self-image, it can help a subject become less defensive.
Our self-image may include the perception that we are honest, ethical, reliable, trustworthy, truthful, responsible, intelligent, congenial, generous, etc.
I started Fit America and the Visualization program to help others lose weight and raise their self-images at the same time.
Those women with higher genital self-images also reported that it is significantly easier to achieve orgasm.
This article will examen these differentiated experiences and self-images of elderly people in a specific place and time: the Netherlands in the nineteenth century.
These images speak to the difficulties women have establishing positive self-images after the "trauma" of gender and sexual socialization.
Founding members of the leading clinic or community practice may believe that mourning is incompatible with their self-images as "strong personalities.