self-image


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Related to self-image: self-concept

self-image

(sĕlf′ĭm′ĭj)
n.
The conception that one has of oneself, including an assessment of qualities and personal worth.

self-image

the total concept, idea, or mental image one has of oneself and of one's role in society; the person one believes oneself to be.

self-image

A person's conception of his or her own appearance, personality and capabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
In looking for measures of competence in teachers, Boyatzis' (1982) onion metaphor of a conscious self-image related to underlying dispositional motives can assist in clarifying the "heart" of a competent teacher (p.
These investigators found that self-esteem scores were correlated negatively with all the perceived stigma scores and were most strongly associated with negative self-image related to stigma.
In this day of low self-esteem, self-image and high teen suicide, why would you ever glorify such violence?
The chapter concludes with a five-point discussion of what determines self, including genetics, self-image, life experiences, attitudes, and friends.
I guess we are, and that's a very sad and disgusting comment on our community's self-image.
While the teasing leads to a fight that allows Lowry to meet his future love interest, it also distorts his self-image.
If we create a positive self-image for the kids, they start letting their successes compound themselves.
The main task of The Qur'an's Self-Image is, hence, to bring to light the complex connotations of the Qur'an's 'book' and 'writing' language as "it is allowed to interpret its own concepts and speak for itself " (p.
Additionally, sexual expression is strongly linked to self-image, and self-image in those with sensory disabilities may be poor as a result of negative reactions from family, friends and the community at large.
The American flag, imagined flapping briskly in the wind, became the most common symbol characterizing this new American self-image.
Stow attempts to address the problem of how the ghetto's inhabitants succeeded in negotiating the intense pressures placed on them by these worsening conditions without losing their unique self-image as both Romans and Jews.